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Full text of "Constitution and playing rules of the National league of professional base ball clubs"

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ADVANCE COPY. 

Compliments of the Publishers, 



1883. 



CONSTITUTION 



PLAYING RULES 



OF THE 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION, 

Including the Proceedings of the League Congress held in Philadelphia 
rrov^nce, New York and Chicago, in 1S83 and 1883, and the 
Official Fielding and Batting Averages of Play- 
er* in Championship Games in iSSa. 



CHICAGO: 
Published by A. G. Spalding & Bros., 

IOS MADISON STREET. 



Entered 



An * CCOr . din £" *° 4 ct o£ Congress, in the year 1883, by A. G. SpaLD 
* Bros., in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, in Washington, 



Spalding 



Correct Diagram of a Ball O round. 



Left 






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lat Baseman 







10 




PI 


TCHE 


R 




♦ ft. 






I 
8 








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3 ft. 


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3 ft. 



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Oatcli»r 



Catcher's fence 



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A. A. A. — Ground reserved for Umpire, Batsman and Catcher. 

B. B. B. — Ground reserved for Captain and Assistant. 
C— Player's Bench, D.— Visiting Players Bat Rack. 
E.— Home Players Bat Rack. 



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IN ME MORI AM. 

WILLIAM A. HTTLBERT, ESQ., 

FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT OF THE 

National League. 

The opening of the season of 1882 was marked by a 
sad event, which cast a shadow of gloom over the entire 
season, and deeply stirred the sensibilities of all who 
love, support, or patronize our national game, and es- 
pecially of the many thousands who have in years gone 
by felt solicitude for its future, and realized the invalua- 
ble service rendered by Mr. William A. Hulbert, of Chi- 
cago, in elevating its moral tone, and in extirpating the 
evils which at one time threatened to ruin it. 

Mr. Hulbert was a man to command attention in any 
undertaking in which he might participate ; of magnifi- 
cent physique, commanding presence, and strong per- 
sonality, endowed with a powerful intellect, keen logic, 
and impressive directness of speech, he was essentially 
a leader among men, and these qualities of leadership, 
guided as they were by^. clear judgment and strict im- 
partiality, and unerring instinct of right and detestation of 
wrong, placed him in an exalted position in the annals of 
our national game, which no one who preceded him had 
ever attained, and no one who follows him can hope to 
completely fill. 

Mr. Hulbert was born Oct. 23, 1832, in Burlington 
Flats, Otsego county, New York, and in 1834 came to 
Chicago with his parents, who were among the earliest 
settlers. He received an excellent education at Beloit 
College, and in 1850 entered upon an earnest and suc- 
cessful business career. He had been a prominent mem- 
ber of the Chicago Board of Trade for about fifteen 
years, and was well known on 'Change as a clear-headed, 
far-sighted, and successful operator, although for several 
years immediately preceding his death his interest in the 
national game, and in the Chicago Ball Club, of which 



8PAJ/DING 8 OFFICIAL 



he was President and mainstay, was so absorbing that 
he largely sacrificed to them his material business 
interests. 

Mr. Hulbert had long approved and contributed to the 
support of the game of base ball in Chicago before he 
took an active interest in it; he was a thorough believer 
in the value to the American people of wholesome out- 
door sports, and saw clearly in the national game a 
means of healthful recreation and physical improve- 
ment, which, properly directed, would be highly benefi- 
cial alike to participants and spectators. 

Before the organization of the League, in the winter 
of 1875-6, he had been persuaded to become an officer 
of the Chicago Base Ball Club, then a member 
of the National Association of Professional Base 
Ball Players. In this capacity he attended the 
annual convention of the Association, held in 
Philadelphia in 1875. Coming thus into direct con- 
tact for the first time with the men who were then 
managing the affairs, and prescribing the rules of h?*e 
ball and base ball clubs, he saw that a radical reform 
should be effected, and an entirely new departure made, 
to place the national game on an enduring footing. The 
idea of a National League originated then and there in 
the mind of Mr. Hulbert, and before he left Philadelphia 
he had thought out the general plan and many of the 
details, which soon afterward assumed form and shape 
in the organization of the National League of Profes- 
sional Base Ball Clubs, which started out in the season 
of 1S76 with eight of the most powerful professional 
clubs in the country in its ranks, and which has contin- 
ued its organization and carried out the policy then and 
there engrafted in its constitution by Mr. Hulbert, down 
to the present day. 

It is needless tb occupy space here in recounting all 
that has been accomplished for the game of base ball 
through Mr. Hulbert's influence and agency. There is 
no one of the many thousands who take part in, or pat- 
ronize the game as it is now exhibited, who does not 
know these things, or who fails to recognize the fact 
that to William A. Hulbert, above all other men, is due 
the credit of rescuing the game from the evils into 
which it had fallen, and from the ruin into which it was 



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BASE BALL OUIDB- 



drifting, and that he, more than any other man, had 
given it its present place as the foremost and best of all 
American field sports. 

Mr. Hulbert died at his residence, !""\ 1334 Fortieth 
street, Chicago, April 10, 1882, after a iong and severe 
illness ; the fatal disease being a complication of heart 
disease and dropsy. How he bore this affliction can 
best be described in the language of Mr. W. I. Culver, a 
prominent Chicago lawyer, in an address made by him 
at a meeting of the stockholders and players of the Chi- 
cago Ball Club, held at the club room, 108 Michi- 
gan avenue, Chicago, the day following Mr. Hulbert's 
death. He said: 

" *A deathbed's a detector of the heart; 
Here tired dissimulation drops her mask.* 

"To those who were present at Mr. Hulbert's bedside 
during the weary nights of his long and fated illness, noth- 
ing was more suggestively prominent than the fact that 
he was dying as he lived — a sincere, earnest, energetic 
man. There was no mask for him to drop; he had 
worn none. Though impatient of suffering and of the 
restraint of his daily increasing weakness, he was bold 
and manly to the last; certain that his days were num- 
bered, hopeless of cure, writhing at times in pain, he 
awaited the liberator death, with as much composure as 
he would have greeted a friend. He lived and died a 
man." 

Mr, Culver's analysis of the character of his dead 
friend was so clear, judicial, and accurate, that we can do 
no better than adopt the following additional extract 
from his remarks on this occasion : 

" Perhaps his main characteristic was positiveness. 
There were no negative qualities about him. His phy- 
sical and mental conditions were reflections of each other 
— both indicative of robust strength. This quality, 
united with others of which I shall speak, gave him a 
conscious power and influence among those with whom 
he came in contact. In whatever he undertook he 
commanded respect by his energetic and candid expres- 
sions of opinion. 

" Essentially a reformer in a material sense, he en- 
forced obedience to his ideas of right rather by concise 






BPAUHNG^S OFFICIAL 



logic than by persuasion. Of the latter, as a means of 
accomplishing results, he knew little, and for it had no 
respect He never employed it. If he could not carry 
his point by convincing the reason of those he sought 
to bring to his way of thinking, he preferred to abandon 
it, but it was seldom he failed. His mental processes 
were so acute, his foresight so extraordinary, and his 
manner of expression so forcible, that it was rarely that he 
made the mistake of advocating an unwise project, or 
that he suffered the humiliation of defeat when he was 
ready to present and urge it. 

" He was an originator, not an adopter of ideas. This 
is exemplified by the work he left behind, for it will be 
admitted without question that the league legislation 
was his creation, and its perfection of plan and detail, 
and the excellent results it has already accomplished, 
prove the foresight and comprehensiveness of mind of 
its originator. 

*' In business and social relations, sincerity and candor 
attended his every act and word. He pretended nothing 
that he was not; "he said nothing that he did not mean. 
No one ever doubted his word, or disbelieved his prom- 
ise." 

The following resolutions were unanimously adopted 
at the meeting referred to : 

" Resolved, That the officers, stockholders, and play- 
ers of the Chicago Base Ball Club have received with 
deep sorrow and regret the sad announcement of the 
death of their esteemed President, W. A. Hulbert. They 
fully appreciate the fact that in losing him the surviving 
officers have lost the leader of their councils, the director 
of their policy, and the promoter of their success; the 
stockholders a zealous and trustworthy custodian of their 
interests, who was ever true to the trusts submitted to 
his care, and the players a sincere friend andpandid ad- 
viser, whose main object was ever to promote their 
welfare, to encourage harmony, and to command for 
them honorable success by teaching them to deserve it. 
Mr. Hulbert was pre-eminent as an organizer ; to him 
almost alone is due the present standard of right and 
honorable dealing so vigorously enforced by the Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, for it 
- was he who conceived the idea of the League itself, and 



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BASE BALL GUIDE. 



to him more than any other are due the main features 
of league legislation and discipline. 

" Resolved, That in order to continue, as far as pos- 
sible, the plans and purposes so ardently fostered by Mr. 
Hulbert concerning the national game, it shall be the 
constant effort of the club and its officers and players to 
preserve its present high standard of integrity and 
fair-dealing in their games and in their intercourse with 
other clubs, and to respect and obey the well-known 
wishes of their late manager and guide. 

" Resolved, That, deeply sympathizing with the fam- 
ily of Mr. Hulbert in their affliction, those present ex- 
press to them their sincere condolence, and that a copy 
of these resolutions, after the same are recorded, be en- 
grossed by the Secretary and transmitted to the widow 
of the deceased." 

At the annual meeting of the National League, held 
in Providence in December last, the following resolu- 
tions were unanimously adopted : 

"Resolved, That by the death of our friend and 
former President, Mr. W. A. Hulbert, the national game 
and this League have alike suffered an irreparable loss. 

" Resolved, That to him alone is due the credit of 
having founded this League, and to his able leadership, 
sound judgment and impartial management, are chiefly 
due the success it has thus far attained, and the substan- 
tial reforms which have been effected in the exhibition 
of the national game since the organization of this 
League. 

1 ' Resolved, That we honor his name, and will ever 
cherish his memory, and will endeavor, in the conduct 
of the affairs of this League, to pursue the line of policy 
which he inaugurated. 

" Resolved, That these resolutions be inscribed upon 
the minutes of this meeting, and that a copy be fur- 
nished Mr. Hulbert' s family", with the assurance of our 
profound sympathy with them in their bereavement." 

Among the many tributes by the press we select a 
few extracts: 

[Chicago Times, April u.] 

"To him, more than to any one else, is due the present popularity 
of the game. A man of the most sterling honesty of purpose, com- 
hined with a rare knowledge of men; never seeking an unfair ad- 



SPALDING S OFFICIAL 



vantage for his own club, never pursuing any devious courses to 
obtain ends, seeing the ultimate results of any particular act with a 
clearness amounting almost to prescience, bold, aggressive, and 
stern in the advocacy of whatever he considered right, and de- 
nouncing what seemed to htm wrong; a man of broad and tender 
sympathies, large-hearted, charitable, and a friend indeed to those 
who possessed his confidence; possessing all these qualities, his in- 
fluence as a presiding officer was felt with power, when he urged 
a measure, his earnestness compelled attention, and that gained, 
his clear and terse logic brought conviction. On more than one 
occasion — notably the last — the League came together with warring 
elements which threatened disruption, only to be brought into per- 
fect accord before adjourning. His death will be a blow to the 
game, and it will be an extremely difficult, if not an impossible 
matter, to fill his place." 

[Chicago Tribune, April n. 

"His great force of character, strong will, marked executive 
ability, unerring judgment of men and measures, and strict integ- 
rity and fairness, were of incalculable value to the League, and he 
was rightly considered to be the brains and backbone of that or- 

fj-anization. In him the game of base ball had the most useful 
riend and protector it has ever had ; and in his death th3 popular pas- 
time suffers a loss the importance of which cannot easily oe exag- 
gerated. There is not in America a player, club, officer, or patron 
of the game who will not feel that the loss is irreparable." 

[Cincinnati Enquirer, April u,] 

"The national pastime yesterday afternoon lost its greatest light 
and brightest mind by the death of William A. Hulbert, President 
of the League, No man had done as much to elevate and foster 
the game as had he. Its wise legislation, strong system of disci- 
pline, commendable rules, in fact, everything that tended to pro- 
mote it and to weed out all of its weak features, were due to his 
wonderful mental abilities. His whole soul was wrapped up in the 
organization of which he had been the prime organizer, and he 
studied week in and week out the best ideas to further enhance 
the attractiveness of the sport, and make it pure and unalloyed." 

These are but a few of the many tributes to his mem- 
ory, but they will serve to show the character of Mr. 
Hulbert, and the estimation in which he was held. His 
estimable widow and manly son, who alone have suf- 
fered by his death a loss more irreparable than that in- 
flicted upon the national game, have found much conso- 
lation in the collection and compilation of hundreds of 
such tributes from leading journals, from prominent sup- 
porters of the game, and from personal friends, which 
the writer of this has seen, and which fill a large vol- 
ume. 

The funeral services were unusually impressive and 
appropriate. The parlors of the family residence were 



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■ '-'J: •- -,.r- .; -. . *■ . 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



thronged with prominent citizens, and the national game 
was represented by Presidents of League clubs and all 
the members of the Chicago nine, while beautiful and 
fitting floral tributes from all parts of the country at- 
tested the respect and sympathy of many absent friends 
and admirers. 

The mortal remains of W. A. Hulbert lie in the most 
beautiful part of Graceland Cemetery, and, in addition to 
the monument erected by his family, the National' League 
have appropriately marked his last resting place by a 
granite monument bearing the name of every League 
club, and typical of the national game which he loved 
and served so well. 








^mm»*m 



INDEX 

TO THE 

OOISTSTX1 TJ TIOInT. 



Section. 

Name i 

Objects 2 

MEMBERSHIP. 

Members for 1883... 3 

Not more than One Club Member from any City 4 

Population of Eligible City. . . 5 

Mode of Applying for Membership 6-7 

Election of Club Member 7 

Mode of Filling Vacancy in Club Membership 8 

Membership of Umpires, Managers and Players 9 

Honorary Membership 10 

League Alliance Clubs and Players Honorary Members. 10 

Forfeiture of League Club Membership 11 

u League Alliance Club Honorary Membership. 12 

** Membership of Umpire, Manager or Player. . . 13 

" Membership, how enforced, and effect thereof. . 14 

Forfeited Membership, how Revoked 15 

Disqualified Persons, Secretary's Record and Notice 16 

DUES. 

Dues of League Club... 17 

'* «* League Alliance Club 18 

OFFICERS. 

President, Election and Duties of. 19 

Board of Directors, Election of 20 

Directors, Qualifications of. 21 

Board of Directors, Duties of. 22 

" " a Meetings of. 23 

«* w " . Reports of. 24 

" a " Proceedings of, not to be Disclosed. 25 

" *' " Filling Vacancy in 26 



4 INDEX TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Section 

Secretary, How Elected 27 

" to be Treasurer 28 

" General Duties of. 29 

'* to Record and Report Violations of Rules and 

Regulations , , 30 

Secretary, Salary and Guaranties, 31 

LEAGUE CLUB, UMPIRES, MANAGERS AND 
PLAYERS. 

Club, Jurisdiction of its Affairs 32 

" " " Territory.. 33 

Restriction as to Games 33 

Contract with Manager or Player. . 34 

Player not under Contract, what Gaines he may Play in. 34 

Notice of Contract with Manager or Flayer 35 

Release from Contract, Notification of. 36 

« " a Effect of. 37 

. When Manager or Player may immediately Engage with 

another Club. 38 

When Manager or Player becomes Ineligible. 39 

Clubs Forbidden to Employ Disqualified Persons 40 

" " " Play Clubs Employing Disqualified 

Persons 41 

Manager or Player, when to Report Grievances 42 

" " " Cause of Expulsion of 42-43 

" " u " " Suspension of.... 44 

Umpire, Cause of Disqualification of. 45 

THE LEAGUE ALLIANCE. 

Membership Qualifications for 46 

** Election to 46 

League Alliance Agreement 47 

League Secretary to Issue Notices 48 

ifc Board to Adjudicate Disputes 49 

" Club Forbidden to Employ Player under Con- 
tract with or Expelled from League Alliance Club 50 

League Alliance Club Forbidden to Employ Player under 
Contract with League Club, or Expelled or Sus- 
pended from the League 51 

League Alliance, representation of, at Annual League 

Meeting 52 

League Alliance Championship 53 

League Club to Play no Game in League Alliance city 

except with League Alliance Club 5 



UH 



—, 



■'"...■ 'J." 1 J.... 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL CLUBS. 6 

Section. 

Regulations for Admission to Games . 55 

Definition of* "Gross" and " Gate" Receipts 5*> 

Division of Receipts, Regulations for 57 

Clubs Ineligible to Membership 5& 

DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS, 

Disputes between Clubs, how Adjudicated 59 

Complaint of Club against Manager or Player of another 

Club 6o 

Appeal of Manager or Player 6i 

When Director is Ineligible to try a Case 62 

Expenses of Trials and Arbitrations 63 

PLAYING RULES. 

When Enacted and Amended 64 

CHAMPIONSHIP. 

Championship to be contended for yearly 65 

«« Season 66 

44 Games, What are. 67 

44 " Number of, in Series.. . . 68 

Tie, or Drawn Games, How Played off. 68 

Home Club Entitled to Half of Series on its Grounds. ... 69 

44 " to Control Exhibition of Game 69 

44 " to be Furnished Batting Order of Visiting Club 69 

Championship Schedule 4 7° 

Schedule Date not to be Changed Except 7° 

Admission to Championship Game, Price of 7 1 

Correspondence Concerning Championship Games, by 

whom Conducted 7 2 

Receipts of Championship Games, Statement and Pay- 
ment of. 73 

Admission to Championship Games, how Regulated 73 

When Visiting Club Entitled to Share of Receipts . . 73 

Clubs to Share Equally the Expenses of Umpire. ....... 74 

League Games Forbidden Prior to Championship Season 75 
Games Between League and Non-League Clubs, Regula- 
tions Governing ■• 7^ 

Games Between League and Non-League Clubs, Division 

of Receipts. (1, 3) 7$ 

Games Between League and Non-League Clubs, Penalty 

' for Non-Payment * (3» 4) 7 6 

Count of Forfeit Games - 77 



6 INDEX TO THE CONSTITUTION. 

Section. 
Drawn, Tie, or Postponed Games not to Count but be 

Played off 78 

The Champion Club 79 

Emblem of Championship. , ...... 79 

Mode of Deciding Championship 80 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Time and Place 81 

Delegates and Visitors 82 

Quorum 83 

Order of Business 84 

AMENDMENTS. 

Two-thirds Vote at Annual Meeting Required • . 85 



■ ■mh m ■ i ii i 






HmBLm^ 



CONSTITUTION 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Professional Base Ball Clubs, 



1883. 



NAME. 



SECTION i. This Association shall be called 
" The National League of Professional 
Base Ball Clubs." 

objects. 

Section 2. The objects of this League are: 

1st. To encourage, foster, and elevate the 
game of base ball; to enact and enforce proper 
rules for the exhibition and conduct of the game, 
and to make base ball playing respectable and 
honorable. 

2d. To protect and promote the mutual in- 
terests of professional base ball clubs and profes- 
sional base ball players, and, 

3d. To establish and regulate the base ball 
championship of the United States. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



MEMBERSHIP. 

Section 3. This League shall consist of the 
following named professional base ball clubs : 

Boston B, B. Association, of Boston, Mass. 

Buffalo B. B. Club, of Buffalo, N. Y. 

Chicago Ball Club, of Chicago, 111. 

Detroit B. B. Association, of Detroit, Mich. 

Cleveland B. B. Association, of Cleveland, O. 

Providence B. B. Association, of Providence, 
R. L 

New York Ball Club, of New York City 

Philadelphia Ball Club, of Phila., Pa. 

And such other professional base ball clubs as 
may from time to time be elected to membership. 

Sec. 4. No club shall be admitted from either 
of the cities above named, other than the clubs 
mentioned, except in the event that either of such 
clubs shall lose its membership, and in no event 
shall there be more than one club from any city. 

Sec. 5. No club shall be admitted from any 
city whose population is less than seventy-five 
thousand (75,000), except by unanimous vote of 
the League. 

Sec. 6. No club shall be admitted unless it 
shall first have delivered to the Secretary of the 
League, at least five days before the annual meet- 
ing, a written application for membership, signed 
by its President and Secretary, accompanied by 
documents showing that such club bears the name 
of the city in which it is located, and that it is 
regularly organized and officered, and, where the 
State law permits it, chartered. Such application 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 9 

shall at once be transmitted by the Secretary to 
the President of the League, who shall forthwith 
refer it to a committee of three members of the 
Board of Directors, appointed by him, who shall 
immediately investigate and report upon said 
application; said report to be communicated to 
the League through the Secretary. 



SEC. 7. The voting upon an application for 
membership shall be by white and black balls. 
Two black balls shall be sufficient to exclude the 
applicant, and no club shall be required, under 
any circumstances, to state how it voted upon 
such application. Such election shall take place 
at the annual meeting of the League: Provided, 
That should any eligible club desire to join the 
League after the adjournment of the annual meet- 
ing, and before March 1 following, it may make 
application in writing to the Secretary of the 
League, who shall at once communicate such 
application, together with any facts in his posses- 
sion concerning such applicant, to the President 
of the League, who shall refer it to a special 
committee of the Board, as provided in Section 
6 ; and upon receipt by the Secretary of the 
report of said committee, he shall transmit 
such application and report to all League clubs, 
each of whom shall, within ten days, trans- 
mit one written ballot, for or against the admis- 
sion of such applicant, to the Secretary; and if 
two adverse ballots be not cast, then the Secre- 
tary shall, upon receipt of the annual dues, noti- 
fy such club of its election, 



10 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION, 



SEC. 8. In case any League club shall forfeit 
its membership during the championship season, 
the Board of Directors shall elect a club member 
of the League Alliance to temporary member- 
ship in the League, which election shall entitle 
such temporary club member, without the pay- 
ment of League club dues, to play all the cham- 
pionship schedule games remaining unplayed by 
the retired League club, upon the same terms 
and conditions as League clubs, except that such 
games shall not count in the championship series, 
and such temporary membership shall terminate 
with the expiration of the championship season. 

SEC. 9. The umpires, managers and players 
employed by the clubs belonging to this League 
shall be considered and treated as members 
hereof to the extent of being always amenable 
to the provisions of this Constitution, and enti- 
tled to all its privileges in matters of dispute, 
grievance or discipline, as provided in this Con- 
stitution. 

SEC. 10. The clubs and players of the League 
Alliance are hereby declared to be honorary 
members of this League. 

SEC. 1 1. The membership of any League club 
shall be forfeited: 

1. By voluntary withdrawal. 

2. By failure to have a representative present 
at the annual meeting of the League. 

3, By disbandment. 

4, By offering, agreeing, conspiring, or at- 
tempting to lose any game of ball, or failing to 
immediately expel any player who shall be proven 



■i mr ^a-^_^.-v;;_u; 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



11 



guilty of offering, agreeing, conspiring" or at- 
tempting to lose any game of ball, or of being 
interested in any pool or wager thereon. 

5. By taking part in any game of ball on 
Sunday, or allowing any game of ball to be 
played upon its grounds on Sunday, or failing to 
immediately expel any person under contract with 
it who shall, at any time during the term of his 
service, take part as umpire, player, "or scorer, in 
any game of ball on Sunday. 

6. By selling, or allowing to be sold, upon its 
grounds, or in any building owned or occupied 
by it, at any time during the championship sea- 
son, any spirituous, vinous, or malt liquors. 

7. By allowing open betting, or pool selling, 
upon its grounds, or in any building owned or 
occupied by it. 

8. By employing or presenting as umpire, 
manager or player, any person disqualified or in- 
eligible under any provision of this Constitution, 

9. By playing any game of ball with any club 
that is disqualified or ineligible under any provi- 
sion of this Constitution. 

io. By failing to present its nine at the time 
and place agreed upon to play any championship 
ganle, unless the failure be caused by an unavoid- 
able accident in traveling. 

ii. By failing to pay to the visiting club the 
amount due such club under the provisions of 
Section 73 of this Constitution. 

12. By failing to pay its annual dues on or 
before the first day of May of each year. 



1% 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



13. By failing to pay its share of the expenses 
of umpires as provided in Section 74. 

14. By failing or refusing to comply with any 
lawful requirement or order of the Board of Di- 
rectors. 

15. By willfully violating any provision of this 
Constitution, or of the Playing Rules adopted 
hereunder. 

Sec. 12. The honorary membership of any 
League Alliance club shall be forfeited : 

1 . By voluntary withdrawal. 

2. By joining any other association of clubs. 

3. By disbandment. 

4. By failing to pay its annual dues. 

5. By failing to pay to the League club the 
amount due such club under the provisions of 
Section 57 of this Constitution. 

6. By any violation of any of the provisions 
of this Constitution concerning the League Alli- 
ance. 

SEC. 13. The membership of any umpire, 
manager or player of this League, or of the 
League Alliance, shall be forfeited upon the dis- 
qualification of such umpire, manager or player, 
under any of the provisions of this Constitution. 

Sec. 14. To carry into effect the provisions of 
Sections II, 12 and 13 of this Constitution, the 
facts in any case covered by such sections must be 
reported to the Secretary of the League, who 
shall at once telegraph the party charged with the 
specified offense, inquiring whether any dispute 
exists as to the facts alleged. In case the facts 
are disputed, the Board shall at once try the case 
under such regulations as they may prescribe, 



— ->- 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



13 



and submit their findings to each League club, 
which shall transmit to the Secretary written 
ballots, " For Expulsion," or " Against Expul- 
sion ; " and if two-thirds of all League clubs vote 
"For Expulsion," the Secretary shall notify all 
League and League Alliance clubs of the forfeit- 
ure of membership of the party charged; and 
every club shall, on and after the receipt of such 
notice, govern its intercourse with such expelled 
member by the prohibitions and penalties pre- 
scribed by this Constitution. Provided (i), in all 
cases where the facts do not admit of dispute (as 
in case of non-payment of dues), or where no 
*?eply to the Secretary's dispatch to the party 
charged with the offense is received by him within 
twenty-four hours, or where the facts are not 
disputed, the Secretary shall forthwith issue his 
notice of forfeiture of membership without sub- 
mitting the matter to the Board or to the League. 
(2) In all cases where the League Alliance alone 
is concerned, the vote of League Alliance, instead 
League clubs, shall be obtained. 

Sec. 15. Any club, umpire, manager ot 
player, having forfeited membership, shall not be 
readmitted, except by unanimous vote of the 
League. 

Sec. 16. A list shall be kept by the Secretary 
of the names of any persons who may be declared, 
by an affirmative vote of five League clubs, at any 
regular or special meeting, to be unworthy of 
service in the League, as umpire, manager, or 
player, and any person so named shall be dis- 
qualified for employment by, or service in, any 
League club, until his name be removed from such 



14 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



list by unanimous vote of all League clubs at a 
regular or special meeting. (See paragraphs 4, 
7 and 12 of League contract.) The Secretary 
shall immediately notify all League and League 
Alliance clubs of any name placed upon or re- 
moved from such list of disqualified persons. 



DUES. 

SECTION 17. Every League club shall pay to 
the Secretary of the League, on or before the 
first day of May of each year, the sum of One 
Hundred Dollars, as annual dues. 

Sec. 18. Every League Alliance club shall 
pay to the Secretary of the League, as annual 
dues for the current year, on joining the League 
Alliance, and thereafter yearly, on or before the 
first day of May, the sum of twenty-five dollars. 

OFFICERS. 

Section 19. At its annual meeting, the 
League shall elect a President by ballot. The 
President shall be ex-officio chairman of the 
Board of Directors. He shall preside at all the 
meetings of the League, and shall call special 
meetings of the League when he may deem it 
necessary, or when thereto requested by half of 
the clubs of the League. 

Should the office of President become vacant 
by death, resignation, or removal, the Board of 
Directors shall elect a President. 

SEC 20. The affairs of this League shall be 
conducted and controlled by five Directors, who 
shall constitute " The Board," and who shall con- 
sist of the President and four members, to be 



- '• . " ""•"..'"... _ .. — **" •> 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



15 



chosen at the annual meeting, in the following 
manner: The name of each club, except that of 
which the President is a member, shall be plainly 
written upon a card, in full view of the delegates 
present, by the Secretary ; the cards to be of the 
same size, shape, color and material. The cards 
shall then be placed in some suitable receptacle 
and well shaken together ; thereupon four of 
these cards shall be drawn successively, and at 
random, and one delegate from each of the four 
clubs whose names are so drawn, shall, with the 
President, compose the Board, and if any club 
whose name is thus drawn be represented by two 
delegates, such delegates shall name one of their 
number to be a member of the Board: Provided, 
that at any time after the adjournment of the an- 
nual League meeting, any League club represent- 
ed in the Board may substitute another represen- 
tative ; such substitution to be attested by written 
notice to the Secretary, signed by the President 
of the League club, and, upon the receipt of 
such notice by the Secretary, such substitution 
shall take effect, and the Secretary shall there- 
upon notify all League and League Alliance 
clubs. 

SEC. 21. No person shall be qualified to act 
as Director, who is not an actual member of the 
club he represents ; nor shall any club, under any 
circumstances, be represented by more than one 
person on the Board. 

Sec. 22. The Board shall have the general 
supervision and management of all the affairs and 
business of the League, and shall be individually 
answerable to the League for the faithful dis- 
charge of their trust. 



16 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



Sec. 23. The Board shall meet annually on 

the evening of the third Tuesday in November, at 

he place where the annual meeting of the League 

is to be held, but may hold special meetings 

whenever urgent necessity may require. 

SEC. 24. The Board shall prepare a detailed 
report of all their doings, and present the same, 
in writing, to the League, at its annual meeting, 
which report shall, if accepted, be filed with the 
Secretary, together with all official papers, docu- 
ments and property which may have come into 
their possession by virtue of their office. 

Sec. 25. Any Director who shall disclose or 
publish any of the proceedings of the Board, 
except officially through the report of the Board, 
or when called upon by vote of the League, shall 
forfeit his office. 

SEC. 26. In case of a vacancy in the Board by 
reason of the death, resignation, absence, or dis- 
qualification of any Director, the club of which 
he was a member at the time he was chosen shall 
designate his successor, and at once notify the 
Secretary. But if such vacancy is caused by the 
withdrawal, disbanding or disqualification of a 
club represented on the Board, the Board may 
fill the vacancy by election in the same manner 
as provided for the election of Directors in Sec- 
tion 20. 

Sec. 27. The Board shall elect a gentleman of 
intelligence, honesty and good repute, who is 
versed in base ball matters, but who is not in any 
manner connected with the press, and who is not 
a member of any professional base ball club, 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



either in or out of the League, to be the Secre- 
tary of the Board and of the League. 

Sec. 28. The Secretary shall be the Treasurer 
of the League, and as such shall be the custo- 
dian of all funds of the League, receive all dues, 
fees and assessments, make such payments as 
shall be ordered by the Board, or by vote of the 
League, and render annually a report of his ac- 
counts. 

SEC. 29. The Secretary shall have the cus- 
tody and care of the official records and papers 
of the League ; shall keep a true record of all 
meetings of the League and the Board, shall is- 
sue all official notices and attend to the necessary 
correspondence ; he shall prepare and furnish 
such reports as may be called for by the Board, 
and shall be entitled to such books, stationery, 
blanks and materials as the actual duties of his 
office may require. 

Sec. 30. The Secretary shall keep a record 
of all infractions of the rules and regulations of 
the League that may come to his notice, and 
shall (except in cases covered by Sections 14 
and 16) make a report on the same to the Presi- 
dent, who shall present it to the Board at its 
next meeting. 

Sec. 31. The Secretary shall receive such 
salary as the Board, by vote, shall determine, 
and shall be reimbursed for all traveling expenses 
actually incurred by him in the service of the 
League ; and the Board may exact from him 
such guaranties for the faithful performance of 
his duties as they may deem for the interest and 



I 



18 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



safety of the League. At the expiration of his 
term of office, he shall account for and deliver 
up to the Board all the property and papers 
which may have come into his hands by virtue of 
his office. 

LEAGUE CLUBS, UMPIRES, MANAGERS, AND 
PLAYERS. 
Section 32. Each club belonging to this 
League shall have the right to regulate its own 
affairs, to make its own contracts, to establish its 
own rules, and to discipline, punish, suspend or 
expel its own manager, players or other em- 
ployes, and these powers shall not be limited to 
cases of dishonest play or open insubordination, 
but shall include all questions of carelessness,' 
indifference, or other conduct of the player that 
may be regarded by the club as prejudicial to its 
interests : Provided, That all club regulations 
must be made subordinate to and in conformity 
with the general regulations established by this 
League, and no club shall prescribe any rule or 
regulation in conflict with any provision of this 
Constitution, or the Playing Rules. (See, also, 
League contract.) 

Sec. 11. Every club member of this League 
shall have exclusive control of the city in which 
it is located, and of the territory surrounding 
such city, to the extent of four miles in every di- 
rection from its corporate limits, and no visiting 
League club shall, under any circumstances—not 
even with the consent of the local League club, 
until all League championship games on that 
ground shall have been finished, be allowed to 
play any club in such territory other than the 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



19 



League club therein located, nor shall a visiting 
League club play any game in April or October 
with any non-League club in such territory with- 
out the consent of the local League club. 

SEC. 34. Any agreement between a club and 
a manager or player for services by the manager 
or player, and compensation therefor by the club, 
must be executed in the form of contract adopted 
by the League (see League contract), and the 
Secretary of the League shall, upon application, 
furnish each League club a suitable supply of the 
printed forms of contract adopted by the League, 
and no player not under such contract shall be 
eligible to play in a League game, except that in 
case a player shall meet with an accident, or be 
expelled by his club, any player who is not oth- 
erwise disqualified, under the provisions of this 
Constitution, may take the place of such ex- 
pelled or injured player; but such player shall not 
be eligible to play for more than five champion- 
ship games in the nine of such club, without the 
contract and notice thereof required by this Sec- 
tion and Section 35. 

SEC. 35. It shall be the duty of a club, as soon 
as it shall have entered into a contract with a 
manager or player, to transmit said contract to 
the Secretary of the League. If the Secretary shall 
find the contract to be in the form adopted by the 
League, he shall indorse upon it his certificate to 
that effect, together with the date of its receipt 
by him, and at once return it to the contracting 
club. The Secretary shall also enter upon his 
records the names of the contracting club, and 
manager or player, and immediately notify all 



20 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



other League clubs of such contract. In no 
case shall the Secretary give such certificate, 
or give notice of such contract, unless it 
comply, in all respects, with the form of contract 
adopted by the League, and no contract shall be 
regarded as valid or binding until it bears the 
Secretary's certificate as herein provided. 

Sec. 36. Any player while under contract with 
a League club, who shall, without the consent of 
such club, agree to enter the service of any other 
club after the expiration of such contract, shall be 
liable to expulsion by said League club. When- 
ever a club releases a manager or player without 
notice, or gives him twenty days notice of release, 
in accordance with paragraphs 15 or 20 of the 
League contract, and whenever it suspends or ex- 
pels a manager or player, that club shall at once 
notify the Secretary, stating, in case of release, the 
date when the same takes effect, and in case of 
suspension or expulsion, the cause thereof, and 
the Secretary shall at once notify all other clubs 
of the League and League Alliance. 

Sec 37. A manager or player who has been 
released from his contract, without suspension or 
cxpulsion, may engage with any other club, 
twenty days from the date of the reception by 
the Secretary of the notice of such release. A 
player released under paragraph 1 5 of the League 
contract, shall not be eligible to play in the nine 
of the club releasing him, during the said twenty 
days, but he may do so if released under para- 
graph 20 of the League contract. 

SEC. 38. A manager or player whose contract 
has become void by reason of his club's disband- 



•■■•■■*- m mm^** 






f ^ l - li r^"^ 



IB 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



21 



ing, withdrawing from or losing its membership 
in the League, may immediately engage for the 
remainder of the season with any other League 
club. 

SEC. 39. No manager or player who has been 
suspended or expelled from a League club, or sus- 
pended by the League under the provisions of 
Section 16 of this Constitution, shall, at any time 
thereafter, be allowed to play with or serve any 
League club (either the one expelling him or 
any other) unless the term of suspension by the 
club has expired, or upon his appeal to the Board, 
such suspension or expulsion shall have been set 
aside, or, in any case under Section 16, his name 
shall have been removed from the list by unani- 
mous vote of the League, as provided in said 
section. 

Sec. 40. No club shall employ as umpire, 
manager, scorer, or player, any person who has 
willfully violated any provision of this Constitu- 
tion, or of the Playing Rules, or who has been 
expelled from any club belonging to this League, 
or who shall be disqualified from playing with a 
club under any provision of this Constitution. 

Sec. 41. No game of ball shall be played 
between a League club and any other club that 
has forfeited its membership in this League. No 
game of ball shall be played between a League 
club and any other club employing or presenting 
in its nine a player expelled, or under suspension, 
from the League. Nor shall any League club 
play any club that has, at any time during the 
same playing season, played a game of ball with 
any other club employing or presenting in its nine 



23 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



any player expelled or suspended from the 
League: Provided \ That in case the club em- 
ploying such expelled or suspended League player 
shall discharge such player from its service, 
League clubs may thereafter play against such 
club, and against other clubs that may have 
played such club while employing such player. 

SEC. 42. Any manager or player who may 
consider himself aggrieved or injured by any act 
of his club, or of any officer, agent or employe 
thereof, shall make his complaint thereof to the 
President of the club when the club " nine " is at 
home. Any manager or player, under contract 
with a I?eague club, who shall, without the writ- 
ten consent of such club, leave its service, or 
who shall be proven guilty of offering, agreeing, 
conspiring, or attempting to lose any game of 
ball, or of being interested in any pool or wager 
thereon, shall be at once expelled by such club. 

SEC. 43. Any manager or player, under con- 
tract with a League club, whose name shall be 
placed upon the list of disqualified persons pro- 
vided for in Section 16 of this Constitution, 
in the manner therein provided, shall, immedi- 
ately upon receipt by such club of the Sec- 
retary's notice of such action, be discharged 
by such club from its service. (See paragraphs 
4, 7 and 12 of the League contract.) 

Sec. 44. Any person under contract with a 
League club, who shall be guilty of drunkenness, 
gambling in any form, insubordination, or of any 
dishonorable or disreputable conduct (except the 
offenses requiring expulsion, specified in Section 
42) may be suspended by such club for. the re- 



IJWBPVPV .:> 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



23 



mainder of the playing season, or for the re- 
mainder of that and all of the ensuing playing 
season, at the option of such club ; and during 
the period of said suspension, such person shall be 
disqualified from playing in or against or serving 
any League club: Provided, That the club having 
made the suspension shall not have power to re- 
scind it, or to curtail its duration. (See para- 
graph 6, League contract.) 

Sec. 45. Any person who shall be proven 
guilty of offering, agreeing, conspiring or at- 
tempting to cause any game of ball to result oth- 
erwise than on its merits under th£ Playing Rules, 
or who, while acting as umpire, shall willfully 
violate any provision of the Constitution, or of 
the Playing Rules adopted hereunder, shall be 
forever disqualified from acting as umpire of any 
game of ball participated in by a League club. 



THE LEAGUE ALLIANCE. 
SECTION 46. Clubs whose organization and 
conduct are not inconsistent with the objects of 
this League, as expressed in Section 2 of this 
Constitution, and who are also eligible under the 
following provisions, and who shall have filed 
with the Secretary of the League a written appli- 
cation for membership, containing an engagement 
to comply with the terms of the following agree- 
ment, as published in the League Book, and with 
all other regulations of the League relating to the 
League Alliance, shall be recognized as consti- 
tuting "The League Alliance, " Provided (1), 
That not more than one club shall be admitted 



24 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



to the League Alliance from any city ; (2) That 
not more than two adverse votes be given on the 
application for membership. Every League and 
League Alliance club shall have one vote upon 
the application for membership, and the Secre- 
tary of the League shall obtain the vote immedi- 
ately upon receipt of the application; (3) That 
the annual dues specified in Section 18 of this 
Constitution, be paid to the League Secretary 
on receipt of his notice of election to member- 
ship. 
Sec. 47. form of "league alliance" agreement. 

// is hereby agreed by ike parties hereto, as follows : 

1. No club that is a party hereto shall employ or play in its 
nine any player to whose services any other club that is a party 
hereto, may be entitled by contract. 

2. Any player under contract with any club that is a party 
hereto, who shall, without the written consent of such club, leave 
its service, or fail to perform his contract, or who shall be prover * 
guilty of disreputable conduct, shall be at once expelled by such 
club. 

3. No club that is a party hereto shall play any game of ball 
with any base ball club whatever, that shall employ or present in 
its nine any player that shall have been expelled from any club 
that is a party hereto, for breach of contract or disreputable con- 
duct. 

4. Each club that is a party hereto shall, upon making a con. 
tract with a player, immediately notify the Secretary of the National 
League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, such notice to be in writing, 
signed by the contracting club and the player, and, in the absence 
of such notice to such officer , any player shall be deemed to be free 
from contract obligation. 

5. Each club that is a party hereto shall, upon expelling a 
player from membership, or releasing him from contract^ notify 
the Secretary of the National League of Professional Base Ball 
Clubs, and in the absence of such notice to such officer, such player 
shall be deemed to be a member in good standing of the club whose 
notice of contract with such player had previously been transmitted 
to such officer, until the expiration of the term of such contract. 

6. All games played by the clubs that are parties hereto, shall 
be played in accordance with the Playing Rules of the National 
^League. 

I 



m _.-,,^,-;:v.^- 



::.. 



t^-a^w ro^w 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



25 



7. All disputes that may arise between the clubs that arc 
parties hereto, shall be submitted to the Board of Directors of the 
National League, for adjudication in the manner provided for by 
Section 49 of its Constitution, and the finding of such tribunal 
shall be final and binding upon the clubs that are parties hereto. 

8. This agreement shall go into effect and be binding upon each 
club upon receipt of the Secretary's notice of its election to mem- 
bership in the League Alliance. 

Sec. 48. The Secretary shall immediately no- 
tify all League and League Alliance clubs, upon 
receipt of any of the notices specified in the 
fourth and fifth clauses of the League Alliance 
agreement, and shall perform such other duties 
as may devolve upon him in furtherance of the 
provisions of said agreement. 

Sec. 49. The Board shall, if thereunto request- 
ed by League Alliance clubs, adjudicate disputes 
in the manner provided in Sections 59, 60, 61 f 62 
and 63, so far as the provisions of such Sections 
may be applicable thereto: Provided \ That all 
communications must be addressed to the Secre- 
tary of the League. 

Sec. 50. No League Club shall employ or 
play in its nine any player to whose services any 
League Alliance Club is entitled by contract evi- 
denced by written notice to the Secretary, signed 
by the contracting club and the player ; nor any 
player expelled by a League Alliance club for 
breach of contract or other disreputable conduct. 

Sec. 5 1 . No League Alliance club shall employ 
or play in its nine any player to whose services 
any League club is entitled by contract evidenced 
by written notice to the Secretary, nor any player 
expelled or under suspension from the League, 



26 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



S'EC; 52. The League shall, at its annual meet- 
ing, receive and consider any* communication 
from a club or clubs of the League Alliance, on 
matters affecting the interests of such club or 
clubs, and shall give a hearing to any delegation 
or delegations therefrom. And two delegates 
from each League Alliance club shall have the 
right to be present at the annual meeting of the 
League. 

Sec. 53, The Secretary shall receive and place 
on file the score of any game played between two 
League Alliance Clubs that may be forwarded to 
him, bearing the certificate of the umpire of such 
game, and stating the names of each club, the 
number of runs made by each, and number of 
innings played, and at the close of the season the 
Secretary shall prepare a tabular statement of 
such games, according to the statement so sent 
him (which statement shall be the sole evidence 
in the matter), and submit the same, with the 
statements so sent him, to the Board, who shall 
award the League Alliance championship to the 
club which shall have won the greatest number 
of such games. The Board shall make the award 
in writing, and report the same to the League at 
its annual meeting, and the League shall, there- 
upon, present such club with a suitable emblem 
of such championship. 



No 



game shall be played between 
and non-League club 



Sec. 54- 
any League club and non-League club in any 
city in which a League Alliance club is locate A, 
except with such League Alliance club. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



2? 



SEC. 55. In all games between League and 
League Alliance clubs, the visiting club shall be 
accorded the right to take, by its agents, all tick- 
ets of admission, and to have sole control of all 
gates, which shall be not more than two in 
number, and, where self-registering turnstiles are 
not used, shall not be more than two and one- 
third feet in width of passage-way, except that 
one carriage gate shall also be allowed, to be also 
under the sole control of the visiting club. 

SEC. 56. In agreements for divisions of re- 
ceipts from games between League and League 
Alliance clubs, " Gross receipts " shall mean all 
receipts from sale of admission and grand stand 
tickets, and for admission to the grounds, to 
grand stands, and to any other special privileges 
of the grounds. " Gate receipts" shall mean all 
receipts from sale of admission tickets and for 
admission to the grounds, but shall net include 
extra fees for admission to grand stands or other 
special privileges of the grounds. 

Sec. 57. The League Alliance club shall, unless 
otherwise agreed by letter, telegram or other writ- 
ing, pay the League club for each game actually 
played, and immediately upon the termination of 
play without reference to the number of Innings 
played, the sum of one hundred dollars, of one- 
half the Gross receipts or Gate receipts, as may 
be previously agreed upon, and the League Alli- 
ance club shall pay the League club fifty dollars 
in every case where a League club shall present 
its nine in the city or town of such League Alli- 
ance club, prepared to play at the time appointed 
for such game, and the game be prevented by 



28 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



rain, or by any other cause than the refusal by 
such League club to play such game. In the 
event of the refusal or failure of any League 
Alliance club to pay the sum or sums due as 
stipulated, the League club shall at once telegraph 
such fact to the Secretary of the League, who 
shall forthwith notify all other League clubs oy 
telegraph, and no League club shall thereafter 
play such defaulting club until the full amount 
due be paid the League club, which League club 
shall, in case of such payment, notify the Secre- 
tary, and he the other League clubs, by telegraph. 
SEC. 58. No club that has forfeited its mem- 
bership in the League, or that is connected with 
any organization of clubs other than the League 
or League Alliance, or that presents in its nine 
any player expelled from the League or League 
Alliance, shall be entitled to the benefits of these 
regulations, and the Secretary shall notify all 
League and League Alliance clubs of any for- 
feiture of such benefits that may be incurred by 
the violation of any provision of these regulations. 



DISPUTES AND COMPLAINTS. 
SECTION 59. The Board of Directors shall be 
the sole tribunal to determine disputes between 
clubs ; the facts to be submitted, and the dispute 
adjudicated under such regulations as the Board 
shall prescribe in each case. The finding of the 
Board shall be final, and under no circumstances 
shall be reconsidered, reopened, or inquired into, 
either by the League or any subsequent Board 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



29 



Sec. 60. The Board shall at once consider any 
complaint preferred by a club against a manager 
or player of another club for conduct in violation 
of any provision of this Constitution, or prejudi- 
cial to the good repute of the game of base ball, 
and shall have power to require the club to which 
such manager or player may belong, to discipline 
him, and, upon repetition of such ottense, to expel 
him: Provided^ That such complaint be preferred 
in writing, giving such particulars as may enable 
the Board to ascertain all the facts, and be trans- 
mitted to the Secretary, by whom it shall at 
once be referred to the Board. 

Sec. 6i. The Board shall also be the sole tri- 
bunal for the hearing of an appeal made by any 
person who shall have been expelled or suspended 
by his club, or for an alleged breach of contract. 
The matter shall be proceeded with in the follow- 
ing manner : Such person shall, within thirty 
days after the date of the expulsion, suspension, 
or alleged breach of contract, file with the 
Secretary a written statement of his defense, 
accompanied by a request that an appeal be al- 
lowed him. The Secretary shall notify the club 
of the request for an appeal, accompanying such 
notice with a copy of the appeal, and, at the next 
annual meeting, the club, by its duly authorized 
representative, and the appellant in person, by 
attorney, or by written statement, shall appear 
before the Board with their testimony. The 
Board shall impartially hear the matter and ren- 
der their decision, which shall bey?;m/and forever 
binding on both club and player. 



30 






LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 






SEC. 62. No director shall sit in the trial of a 
cause in which his club is interested. 

Sec. 63. Any expenses of trials or arbitrations 
shall be borne equally by the parties to the con- 
troversy. 

PLAYING RULES. 
SECTION 64. The League, at its first meeting, 
shall adopt a code of Playing Rules, which shall 
continue in force, subject only to such alterations 
or amendments as may be made at subsequent 
annual meetings of the League. 



CHAMPIONSHIP. 

SECTION 65. The Championship of the United 
States f established by this League, shall be con- 
tended for yearly by the clubs composing this 
League. 

Sec. 66. The championship season shall extend 
from the first day of May to (and including) the 
first day of October, and no game shall count in 
the championship series unless played during the 
championship season : Provided, That if the first 
day of May occurs on Sunday, the championship 
season shall begin April 30th ; and if the first 
day of October occurs on Sunday, the champion- 
ship season shall end October 2d. 

Sec. 67. Every game played between two 
clubs from the commencement of the champion- 
ship season to the completion of the champion- 
ship series between such clubs, shall be a game 
for the championship, and no League club shall 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



31 



lend or exchange players, to or with each other, 
for any game played during the championship 
season. 

SEC. 68. Each club shall play the following 
number of championship games (and no more) 
with every other club. If six clubs be members 
of the League on the first day of the champion- 
ship season, sixteen games; if eight clubs, 
fourteen games: Provided, however, that if any 
game be prevented by rain, or if a tie or drawn 
game be played, the visiting club shall play off 
such tie or drawn game, or game prevented by 
rain, on the first succeeding day (not counting 
Sundays, days previously agreed upon for cham- 
pionship games between said clubs, or days 
when rain renders playing impossible), within the 
dates of the same sehedule series between such 
clubs, if any remain open ; and if not, such game 
may be played off on any open date between any 
two series on the same grounds '.Provided, that if 
such a game be due on the completion of the first 
schedule series between two clubs, and be not 
played off until the next schedule series between 
such clubs on the same grounds, it shall be played 
off on the first open date of such series if there 
be any. 

Sec. 69. Each club shall have half of the 
championship series of games with every other 
club played on its own grounds ; and in all the de- 
tails of such games that do not involve the rights 
of the visiting club under the Playing Rules, but 
relate solely to such games as attractive exhibi- 
tions to the patrons of the home club, the visiting 
club shall defer to the wishes of the home club, ana 
the visiting club shall furnish to a person designated 



32 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



by the home club the batting order of its nine by 
10 o'clock on the morning of the day of each game. 
In case of the failure of any visiting club to fur- 
nish the batting order of its nine as herein stipu- 
lated, it shall forfeit the sum of ten dollars, which 
amount shall be immediately transmitted to the 
Secretary of the League upon the receipt of no- 
tice from him of the infliction of such fine, which 
notice shall be given by the Secretary upon re- 
ceipt of complaint from the home club. 

Sec. 70. All championship games shall be ar- 
ranged for in writing, and so as to complete the 
championship series by the expiration of the 
championship season. Such written arrangement 
shall be made by such method as the League shall 
direct, before the beginning of the championship 
season, and shall consist of a schedule and agree- 
ment relating thereto, which agreement shall be 
signed by every League club, and the schedule 
and agreement filed with the Secretary of the 
League, and a copy thereof, bearing his certifi- 
cate as to its correctness, furnished by the Secre- 
tary to every League club. The schedule shall 
provide for an equal number of return games, 
and specify the date of each game, and the dates 
of each series of games. No date in said sched- 
ule shall subsequently be changed, except (1) 
by written agreement of two clubs, from a date 
fixed by the schedule for a game between such 
clubs to another day between the first and last 
date of the same schedule series between such 
clubs; or (2) as provided in Section 68; or (3) by 
the written consent of all the League clubs. 

SEC. 71. The price of admission to champion- 
ship games shall be fifty cents for each adult per- 






./•/,. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION'. 



33 



son, and no money or tickets paid for admission 
shall be refunded in any case in which the game 
is prevented or interrupted by rain. 

Sec. 72. In correspondence between clubs, all 
letters and telegrams concerning umpires, dates, 
and other matters pertaining to championship 
games, to a club at home, must be addressed to 
and answered by its President, or by an officer of 
such club designated by its President to act for 
him in such matters, the Secretary of the League 
to be notified of such designation. If such commu- 
nications be made by another club when at home, 
they must be addressed by and answered to its 
President or his representative as above pro- 
vided; and if the corresponding club be ab- 
sent from home, they must be addressed by and 
answered to its manager. 

SEC. 73. At the conclusion of each champion- 
ship game, the Home club shall deliver to 
the manager of the Visiting club (and shall 
transmit by mail to the Visiting club a du- 
plicate of same) a statement of the receipts 
of said game, and shall pay to the author- 
ized agent of such Visiting club the sum of 
fifteen (15) cents for each and every person ad- 
mitted to the grounds to witness such game, or 
any part thereof, or admitted to the grounds for 
any other purpose during or prior to such game, 
or the hour appointed therefor, excepting only 
players of the contesting clubs and policemen in 
uniform 

The number of persons admitted to the grounds 
shall be determined by the use of the necessary 
number of self-registering turnstiles, the keys of 



!■ 



34 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



which shall be delivered to the agent of the Visit- 
ing club before the opening of the grounds for. 
each game ; and said agent of the Visiting club 
shall have the right to affix a seal to the register, 
or box, of such turnstile, and the box of such 
turnstile shall not be removed until after the close 
of the seventh inning ; and in case a carriage 
gate is used, a ticket for each person admitted 
through such gate shall at once be delivered to 
the agent of the Visiting club. 

To entitle the Visiting club to the payment 
herein specified, it shall be sufficient for the visit- 
ing club to present its nine upon the grounds at 
the hour appointed and prepared to play the game 
in the absence of rain. 

Sec, 74. The Secretary shall be authorized to 
draw upon each club, on the 25th day of each 
month, during the term of service of the staff of 
League umpires, for a sum not to exceed one 
hundred and eighty dollars, for the payment of the 
salaries and expenses of such umpires, (See also 
Par. 13, Sec. 11.) 

Sec. 75. No game shall be played between 
League clubs before the commencement of the 
championship series. 

Sec. 76. No game shall be played between 
any League club and any non-League club, or 
picked nine, upon the grounds of any League 
club, from the commencement to the completion 
of the championship series upon such grounds; 
no game shall be arranged or played between any 
League and non-League clubs, or picked nines, 
for or upon any " off days " of the championship 
series, except as above provided, and upon the 
following express conditions: 



wmmmmmm^BM 



'--—..- - 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



35 



i. If a League championship game be pre- 
vented by rain or unavoidable accident on the 
day (not counting Sunday) preceding the day 
agreed upon for such non-League or picked-nine 
game, then the latter shall be declared off, so as to 
allow the League clubs to play the chamoionship 
game on that da} f . 

2. All such games shall be played under such 
rules, with such ball and such umpire, as may be 
mutually agreed upon by the League club and 
non-League club. 

3. The non-League club (except League Alli- 
ance clubs) shall, unless otherwise agreed by letter, 
telegram, or other writing, pay the League club, 
immediately upon the termination of play without 
reference to the number of innings played the 
sum of one hundred dollars, or one-half the gross 
receipts of such game, in case the gross receipts 
shall exceed two hundred dollars ; and it is to be 
distinctly understood that the " gross receipts " 
include all revenue derived from the exhibition, 
whether taken at regular or carriage gates, or for 
admission to grounds, grand stands, or to other 
special privileges of the grounds; also, that the 
visiting club shall have sole control of all gates, 
and of all entrances to grand stands, or other 
special ground privileges for which extra fees are 
charged. And the non-League club shall pay 
the League club fifty dollars in every case where 
a League club shall present its nine in the city or 
town of such non-League club, prepared to play 
at the time appointed for such game, and the 
game be prevented by rain, or by any cause other 




LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 

than the refusal by such League club to play 
such game. In the event of the refusal or failure 
of any non-League club to pay the sum, or 
sums, due, as stipulated, the League club shall at 
once telegraph such fact to the Secretary of the 
League, who shall forthwith notify all other 
League clubs by telegraph ; and no League club 
shall thereafter play such defaulting club until 
the full amount due be paid the League club, 
which League dub shall, in case of such pay- 
ment, notify the Secretary, and he the other 
League clubs, by telegraph. 

4. In any case "not covered by the first con- 
dition specified in this section, a League club 
having agreed to play a non-League club upon 
the grounds of the latter, and failing to present 
its nine in the city or town of such non-League 
club, prepared to play at the time appointed for 
such game, the League club shall pay the non- 
League club the sum of fifty dollars or such other 
sum as may have been mutually agreed upon, as 
the penalty of such default. 

Sec. 77. A club shall be entitled to forfeited 
games — to count in its series as games won by a 
score of nine runs to none — in cases where the 
umpire in any championship game shall award 
the game to such club on account of the violation 
by the contesting club of any playing rule of 
this League. 

Sec. 78. Drawn, tie and postponed games 
shall not count in the series as games, but must 
be played off, if possible, as provided in Section 
68. If they cannot be played off as therein 
provided, they may subsequently be played 
off, if sufficient time exist before the close of 
the season. 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



37 



Sec. 79. The club which shall have won the 
greatest number of games in the championship 
series, shall be declared the champion club of the 
United States for the season in which such games 
were played. In the event that two or more 
clubs shall have won the same number of games, 
then the club which shall have lost the smallest 
number shall be declared the champion, and in 
case two or more clubs be tied for first place on 
games won and lost, the Board shall at once ar- 
range a special series of five games between any 
two of such clubs, such games to be played in the 
month of October, and the games so played shall 
be included in the championship record and count- 
ed in determining the award of the championship. 
In such case only the provisions of this Consti- 
tution prohibiting the playing or recording as 
championship games, games played after the ex- 
piration of the championship season, shall have no 
effect. 

The emblem of the championship shall be a 
pennant (of the national colors), to cost not less 
than one hundred dollars ($100). It shall be in- 
scribed with the motto, " Champion Base Ball 
Club of the United States," with the name of the 
club and the year in which the title was won, and 
the champion club shall be entitled to fly the 
pennant until the close of the ensuing season. 

SEC. 80. The championship shall be decided 
in the following manner : 

Within twenty-four hours after every match 
game played for the championship, the home 
club shall prepare and forward to the Secretary 
of the League a statement containing the full 
score of the game, according to the system speci- 



£a 



38 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



fied in the "Playing Rules," the date, place 
where played, and the names of the clubs and 
umpire : Provided \ That no tie or drawn game 
shall be considered " a game " for any purpose, 
nor shall the score thereof be forwarded to the 
Secretary; and provided further, that in any case 
where the Secretary shall not receive the score of 
a championship game within five days after the 
playing of such game, the club whose duty it is 
to forward such score shall pay to the League the 
sum of ten dollars as the penalty of such default. 

At the close of the season, the Secretary shall 
prepare a tabular statement of the games won 
and lost by each club, according to the state- 
ments so sent him (which statements shall be the 
sole evidence in the matter), and submit the same, 
with the statements so sent him, to the Board, 
who shall make the award in writing, and report 
the same to the League at its annual meeting. 
In making the award the Board shall consider : 

i. The tabular statement of the Secretary. 

2. Forfeited games. 

3. Games participated in by clubs which have 
withdrawn, disbanded or forfeited their member- 
ship without completing their championship se- 
ries with all other League clubs ; such games 
shall be counted to the following extent : The 
Board shall ascertain the least number of cham- 
pionship games played by such club with any 
club remaining in the League, and shall, from the 
first games participated in during the champion- 
ship season, by such retired club, count in the 
series of each League club a similar number of 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



39 



games, and all other games participated in by 
such retired club shall not be counted in the 
championship series : Provided, That if such re- 
tired dub shall have failed to play at least one 
championship game with every League club, all 
games participated in by it shall be thrown out 
entirely. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Sec. 8i. The annual meeting of the League 
shall be held on the Wednesday after the 

third Tuesday in November of each year, at 
twelve o'clock noon, and at such place as shall 
be determined by vote at the previous annual 
meeting. 

Sec. 82. At such meeting each club shall be 
represented, and shall be entitled to two represen- 
tatives, and to have, in addition thereto, any of its 
officers or ex-officers present at such meeting; but 
no club shall be permitted to send as a represen- 
tative any person under contract or engagement 
as a ball player, and belonging to the nine of such 
club in said capacity; they shall present a certifi- 
cate from the President or Secretary of their club, 
showing their authority to act; but no club shall 
have more than one vote. 

Sec. 83. A representation of a majority of 
clubs shall constitute a quorum for the transac- 
tion of business, but a less number may adjourn 
from time to time until a quorum is obtained. 

Sec. 84. The following shall be the order of 
business. 

1. Reading minutes of last meeting. 

2. Report cf Board of Directors. 

3. Election of new members. 

4. Amendment of Constitution, 



■■•■■■ 



. 



40 



5- 
6. 

7- 



LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 



Amendment of Playing Rules. 

Miscellaneous business. 
Election of Officers. 
8. Adjourment. 

AMENDMENTS. 
Section 85. The Constitution or Playing Rules 
of this League may bealtered oramended byatwo- 
thirds vote of the League at any annual meeting 



iistidex: 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 



RULE 

The Ground i 

The Infield 2 

The Bases 3 

The Foul Lines 4 

The Pitcher's Lines , 5 

The Catcher's Lines , . 6 

The Captain's Lines. . .„ 7 

The Players' Lines 8 

The Player's Bench 9 

The Batsman's Lines 10 

The Three Feet Lines 11 

The Lines Must be Marked 12 

The Ball 13 

of what composed (1) 13 

furnished by Home Club (2) 13 

replaced if injured . . (3) 13 

" ulost (4) *3 

The Bat 14 

FIELD RULES. 

Open Betting and Pool Selling Prohibited 15 

Sale of Liquor Prohibited , , . . 16 

,\ T o Person Allowed on Field During Game ij 

P/ayers Not to Sit with Spectators 18 

P-e jnlty for Insulting Umpire 19 

1 enalty for Not Keeping Field Clear 20 

\t ^striction as to Addressing Audience 21 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

N '.ne Players on Each Side 22 

Players' Positions 23 

in the Field (1) 23 

at the Bar., (2) 23 

41 



mm 






42 



INDEX TO RULES AND REGULATION B 



Order of Batting , . , . .(3) 23 

Restriction as to Occupying Catcher's Lines (4) 23 



DEFINITIONS. 

A High Ball.. 24 

A Low Ball., i . , ... . 25 

A High or Low Ball 26 

A Fair Ball 27 

An Unfair Ball 28 

A Balk 29 

A Foul Balk 30 

A Dead Ball 31 

A Block. .. , 32 

A Fair Hit 33 

A Foul Hit 34 

A Strike 35 

A Foul Strike 36 

"Play " 37 

" Time " 38 

" Game " . 39 

An Inning 40 

A Time at Bat 41 

Legal, or Legally 42 

THE GAME. 



Number of Innings 43 

Drawn Game 44 

Forfeited Game 45 

"No Game'* .. 48 

Substitute, when Allowed 47 

Choice of First Innings 48 

When Umpire Must Call " Play " 49 

Game Must Begin when " Play * is Called 49 

When Umpire May Suspend Play 49 

«' " t( Terminate Game 49 

Rain, effect of, in Terminating Game (4) 43 

« • « " « « 44 

" • " « " . 40 

" Definition of, . „ 49 

" Umpire's Duty in Case of 49 

Batsman Must Call for Ball He Wants 50 

What Umpire Must Count and Call .so 

When Batsman is Out 5 1 

" ** becomes Base-Runner S a 



OF PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL OLUBS. 



43 



Base- Runner must Touch Bases in Order 53 

" u when entitled to hold Base 53 

" M * " take one Base 54 

** " when required to return to Base 55 

No Substitute Allowed for Base-runner 56 

When Base-runner is Out 57 

When Umpire shall, without appeal, declare player "Out" 58 

When Ball is not in Play until Returned to Pitcher 59 

Block, effect of 60 

Run, when to be Scored 61 

Fines on Pitcher. 62 

" " any Player 63,(4)68, 69 

Player not to Address Umpire 63 

" " «* Audience 21 

" " use Improper Language (4) 6S 

u to Obey Umpire's Orders (4) 68 

THE UMPIRE. 

Selection of Umpire • * 64 

Disqualification of Umpire (3) 64 

Removal of Umpire • . « .(4) 64 

Duties as to Materials of Game (1) 65 

« " GroundRules -h) 65 

" u Reversal of Decision (2) 65 

Changing Umpire during Game 66 

Expulsion of Umpire. 6f 

Umpire's Jurisdiction and Powers 6S 

Umpire to give Notice of Fine (5), (6) 68 

" ** « " Forfeited Game (6) 68 

Special Penalties 69 

Scoring Regulations 7° 

CONSTRUCTION AND AMENDMENTS. 

Construction of Rules a . . 71 

Amendment of Rules - . . . 73 



PLAYING RULES 



—OF THE- 



NATIONAL LEAGUE 



Professional Base Ball Clubs, 

1883. 



ADOPTED IN PURSUANCE OF SECTION 64 OF THE 
LEAGUE CONSTITUTION. 

CLASS L 

THE MATERIALS OF THE GAME. 

RULE i. The Ground must be an inclosed 
field, sufficient in size to enable each player to 
play in his position as required by these Rules. 

RULE 2. The Infield must be a space of ground 
thirty yards square. 

Rule 3. The Bases must oe 

(1) Four in number, and designated as First 
Base, Second Base, Third Base and Home Base. 

(2) The Home Base must be of white marble 
or white stone, twelve inches square, so fixed in 
the ground as to be even with the surface, and so 
placed in a corner of the infield that two of its 
sides will form part of the boundaries of said in* 
field. 



'"**" "V 



PLAYING RULES. 



45 



(3) The First, Second and Third Bases must 
De canvas bags, fifteen inches square, painted 
white, and filled with some soft material, and so 
placed that the center of each shall be upon a 
separate corner of the infield, the First Base at 
the right, the Second Base opposite, and the 
Third Base at the left of the Home Base. 

(4) All the Bases must be securely fastened 
in their positions, and so placed as to be distinctly 
seen by the Umpire. 

RULE 4. The Foul Lines must be drawn in 
straight lines from the outer corner of the Home 
Base, through the center of the positions of First 
and Third Bases, to the boundaries of the Ground. 

Rule 5. The Pitcher's Lines must be straight 
lines forming the boundaries of a space of 
ground, in the Infield, six feet long by four feet 
wide, distant fifty feet from the center of the 
Home Base, and so placed that the six feet lines 
would each be two feet distant from and parallel 
with a straight line passing through the center 
of the Home and Second Bases. Each corner 
of this space must be marked by a flat iron plate 
or stone, six inches square, fixed in the ground, 
even with the surface. 

RULE 6. The Catcher s Lines must be drawn 
from the outer corner of the Home Base, in 
continuation of the Foul Lines, straight to the 
limits of the Ground back of the Home Base. 

Rule 7. The Captain s Lines must be drawn 
from the Catcher's Lines to the Limits of the 
Ground, fifteen feet from and parallel with the 
Foul Lines. * 






46 



PLAYING RULES. 



RULE 8. The Players" Lines must be drawn 
from the Catcher's Lines to the limits of the 
Ground, fifty feet from and parallel with the Foul 
Lines. 

RULE 9. The Players' Bench must be fur- 
nished by the Home Club, and placed upon a por- 
tion of the Ground outside the Players' Lines. It 
must be twelve feet in length and immovably 
fastened to the ground. At each end of such 
bench must be immovably fixed a bat-rack, with 
fixtures for holding twenty bats; one such rack 
must be designated for the exclusive use of the 
Visiting Club, and the other for the exclusive use 
of the Home Club. 

Rule 10. The Batsman's Lines must be 
straight lines forming the boundaries of a space 
on the right, and of a similar space on the left of 
the Home Base, six feet long by three feet wide, 
extending three feet in front of and three feet 
behind the center of the Home Base, and with its 
nearest line distant one foot from the Home Base. 

RULE ii. The Three Feet Lines must be 
drawn as follows: From a point on the Foul 
Line from Home Base to First Base, and equally 
distant from such bases, shall be drawn a line on 
Foul Ground, at a right angle to said Foul Line, 
and to a point three feet distant from it ; thence 
running parallel with said Foul Line, to a point 
three feet distant from the center of the First 
Base ; thence in a straight line to the center of 
the First Base, and thence upon the Foul Line to 
the point of beginning. 



y 



PLAYING RULES. 



4? 



RULE 12. The lines designated in Rules 4, 5, 
6, 7, 8, 10 and 11 must be marked with chalk or 
other suitable material, so as to be distinctly seen 
by the Umpire. They must all be so marked 
their entire length, except the Captain's and 
Players' Lines, which must be so marked for a 
distance of at least thirty-five yards from the 
Catcher's Lines. 

Rule 13. The Ball 

(1) Must not weigh less than five nor more 
than five and one-quarter ounces avoirdupois, 
and measure not less than nine nor more than 
nine and one-quarter inches in circumference. 
It must be composed of woolen yarn, and con- 
tain not more than one ounce of vulcanized rub- 
ber in mould form, and be covered with leather. 
It must be furnished by the Secretary of the 
League, whose seal shall be final evidence of the 
legality of the ball.* 

(2) In all games the ball or balls played with 
shall be furnished by the Home Club, and be- 
come the property of the winning club. 

(3) Should the ball become out of shape, or 
cut or ripped so as to expose the yarn, or in any 
way so injured as to be unfit for fair use in the 
opinion of the Umpire, on being appealed to by 
either Captain, a new ball shall at once be called 
for b) r the Umpire. 

(4) Should the ball be lost during the game, 
the Umpire shall, at the expiration of five min- 
utes, call for a new ball. 

♦ The "Spalding League Ball," having: been adopted as the official 
ball of the National League for 1SS3, must be used m all match games 
played under League rules. 






48 



PLAYING RULES. 






Rule 14. The Bat 

(1) Must be made wholly of wood. 

(2) It must be round, must not exceed two 
and one-half inches in diameter in the thickest 
part, and must not exceed forty-two inches in 
length. 

CLASS II. 

FIELD RULES. 

RULE 15. No Club shall allow open betting or 
pool selling upon its grounds, nor in any building 
owned or occupied by it. 

Rule 16. No Club shall sell or allow to be 
sold upon its grounds, nor in any building owned 
or occupied by it, any spirituous, vinous or malt 
liquors. 

RULE 17. No person shall be allowed upon 
any part of the field during the progress of the 
game, in addition to the nine players on each side 
and the umpire, except such officers of the law as 
may be present in uniform to preserve the peace. 

RULE 18. Players in uniform shall not be 
permitted to seat themselves among the specta- 
tors. 

1 Rule 19. The umpire is the sole judge of 
play, and is entitled to the respect of the specta- 
tors, and any person hissing or hooting at, or 
offering any insult or indignity to him, must be 
promptly ejected from the grounds. 

RULE 20. Every Club shall furnish sufficient 
police force upon its own grounds to preserve 
order, and in the event of a crowd entering the 



PLAYING RULES. 



49 



field during the progress of a game, and inter- 
fering with the play in any manner, the Visiting 
Club may refuse to play further until the field be 
cleared ; and if the ground be not cleared within 
fifteen minutes thereafter, the Visiting Club may 
claim, and shall be entitled to, the game by a 
score of nine runs to none (no matter what num- 
ber of innings have been played). 

Rule 21. No Umpire, Manager, Captain or 
Player shall address the audience during the prog- 
ress of a game, except in case of necessary ex- 
planation. 



CLASS III. 

THE PLAYERS AND THEIR POSITIONS. 

Rule 22. The Players of each club, in a 
match game, shall be nine in number, one of 
whom shall be the Captain. 

Rule 23. The Players 1 Positions shall be 

(1) When in the field (designated " Field- 
ers " in these Rules) such as may be assigned 
them by their Captain, except that the Pitcher 
must take his position within the Pitcher's Lines, 
as defined in Rule 5. 

(2) When their side goes to the bat they 
must immediately seat themselves upon the Play- 
ers* Bench, and remain there until the side is put 
out, except when batsman or base-runner. All 
bats not in use must be kept in the bat racks, 
and the two players next succeeding the Bats- 
man, in the order in which they are named on 
the Score, must be ready with bat in hand to 
promptly take position as batsman : Provided, 






50 



PLAYING RULES. 



that the Captain, and one assistant only, may 
occupy the space between the Players' Lines and 
the Captain's Lines, to coach Base-Runners. 

(3) The Batsmen must take their positions 
within the Batsman's Lines, as defined in Rule 10, 
in the order in which they are named on the 
Score, which must contain the batting order of 
both nines and must be followed, except in case 
of disability of a player, in which case the substi- 
tute must take the place of the disabled player in 
the batting order. 

(4) No player of the side at bat, except when 
Batsman, shall occupy any portion of the space 
within the Catcher's Lines as defined in Rule 6. 



CLASS IV. 

DEFINITIONS. 

RULE 24. A High Ball is a ball legally de- 
livered by the Pitcher, over the Home Base, 
higher than the belt of the Batsman, but not 
higher than his shoulder. 

RULE 25. A Loiv Ball is a ball legally deliv- 
ered by the Pitcher, over the Home Base, not 
higher than the Batsman's belt, nor lower than 
his knee. 

Rule 26. A High or Low Ball is a ball 
legally delivered by the Pitcher, over the Home 
Base, not higher than the Batsman's shoulder, nor 
lower than his knee. 

Rule 27. A Fair Ball is a ball delivered 
by the Pitcher, while wholly within the lines 
of his portion and facing the Batsman, with 



PLAYING RULES. 



51 



his hand passing below his shoulder, and the 
ball passing over the Home Base at the height 
called for by the Batsman. 

RULE 28. An Unfair Ball is a ball delivered 
by the Pitcher as in Rule 27, except that the ball 
does not pass over the Home Base, or does not 
pass over the Home Base at the height called for 
by the Batsman. 

Rule 29. A Balk is 

(1) A motion made by the Pitcher to deliver 
the ball to the bat without delivering it, except 
the ball be accidentally dropped; or, 

(2) The ball be held by the Pitcher so long 
as to delay the game unnecessarily; or, 

(3) Delivered to the bat by the Pitcher when 
any part of his person is upon ground outside the 
lines of his position. 

RULE 30. A Foul Balk is a ball delivered to 
the bat by the Pitcher by an overhand throw, or 
any swing of the arm or hand other than that 
prescribed in Rule 27, 

RULE 31. A Dead Ball is a ball delivered to 
the bat by the Pitcher, that touches the Batsman's 
bat, without being struck at, or any part of the 
Batsman's person while standing in his position, 
without being struck at, or any part of the Um- 
pire's person, without first passing the Catcher. 

RULE 32. A Block is a batted or thrown ball 
that is stopped or handled by any person not en- 
gaged in the game. 



52 



PLAYING RULES. 



RULE 33. A Fair Hit is a ball batted by the 
Batsman, standing in his position, that first 
touches the ground, the First Base, the Third 
Base, the part of the person of a player, or any 
other object that is in front of or on either of 
the Foul Lines, or {Exception) batted directly to 
the ground by the Batsman, standing in his posi- 
tion, that (whether it first touches Foul or Fair 
Ground) bounds or rolls within the Foul Lines, 
between Home and First, or Home and Third 
Bases, without first touching the person of a 
player. 

Rule 34. A Foul Hit is a ball batted by the 
Batsman, standing in his position, that first touches 
the ground, the part of the person of a player, or 
any other object that is behind either of the Foul 
Lines, or that strikes the person of such Batsman, 
while standing in his position, or {Exception) 
batted directly to the ground by the Bats jan, 
standing in his position, that (whether it first 
touches Foul or Fair Ground) bounds or rolls 
outside the Foul Lines, between Home and First, 
or Home and Third Bases, without first touching 
the person of a player. 



Rule 35. A Strike is 

(1) A ball struck at by the Batsman without 
it touching his bat; or, 

(2) A ball legally delivered by the Pitcher at 
the height called for by the Batsman, and over 
the Home Base, but not struck at by the Bats- 
man. 



PLAYING RULES. 



53 



RULE 36. A Foul Strike is a ball batted by 
the Batsman when any part of his person is upon 
ground outside the lines of the Batsman's posi- 
tion. 

RULE 37. Play is the order of the Umpire to 
begin the game, or to resume play after its sus- 
pension. 

RULE 38. Time is the order of the Umpire to 
suspend play. Such suspension must not extend 
beyond the day of the game. 

RULE 39. Game is the announcement by the 
Umpire that the game is terminated. 

RULE 40. An Lining is the turn at bat of the 
nine players representing a Club in a game, and 
is completed when three of such players have 
been put out as provided in these Rules. 

Rule 41. A time at bat is the term at bat of 
a batsman. It begins when he takes his posi- 
tion, and continues until he is put out, or be- 
comes a base runner. 

RULE 42. Legal, or Legally, signifies as re- 
quired by these rules. 



CLASS V. 

THE GAME. 

RULE 43- A Game shall consist of nine inn- 
ings to each contesting nine, except that: 

(1) If the side first at bat scores less runs in 
nine innings than the other side has scored in 
eight innings, the game shall then terminate. 



54 



PLAYING RULES. 



^2) If the side last at bat in the ninth innings 
scores the winning 1 run before the third man is 
out, the game shall then terminate. 

(3) If the score be a tie at the end of nine 
innings to each side, play shall only be continued 
until the side first at bat shall have scored one or 
more runs than the other side, in an equal num- 
ber of innings; or until the other side shall score 
one more run than the side first at bat 

(4) If the Umpire calls " Game " on account 
of darkness or rain at any time after five innings 
have been completed by both sides, the score 
shall be that of the last equal innings playecl, un- 
less the side second at bat shall have scored one 
or more runs than the side first at bat, in which 
case the score of the game shall be the total num- 
ber of runs made. 

RULE 44. A Drawn Game shall be declared 
by the Umpire when he terminates a game, on 
account of darkness or rain, after five equal inn- 
ings have been played, if the score at the time is 
equal on the last even innings played ; but {Ex- 
ception) if the side that went second to bat is then 
at the bat, and has scored the same number of 
runs as the other side, the Umpire shall declare 
the game drawn, without regard to the score of 
the last equal innings. 

RULE 45. A Forfeited Game shall be declared 
by the Umpire, in favor of the Club not in fault, 
in the following cases: 

(1) If the nine of a club fail to appear upon, 
the Field, or, being upon the Field, fail to begin 



,.--.,- -*.... . 



PLAYING RULES. 



55 



the game, within five minutes after the Umpire 
has called " Play" at the hour appointed for the 
beginning of the game. 

(2) If, after the game has begun, one side re- 
fuses or fails to continue playing, unless such 
game has been suspended or terminated by the 
Umpire. 

(3) If, after play has been suspended by the 
Umpire, one side fails to resume playing within 
five minutes after the Umpire has called " Play." 

(4) If, in the opinion of the Umpire, any one 
of these Rules is willfully violated. 

RULE 46. " No Game" shall be declared by 
the Umpire if he shall terminate play, on account 
of rain or darkness, before five innings on each 
side are completed. 

RULE 47. A Substitute shall not be allowed 
to take the place of any player in a game, unless 
such player be disabled in the game then being 
played, by reason of illness or injury. 

RULE 48. The Choice of First Innings shall 
be determined by the two Captains. 

RULE 49. The Umpire must call " Play " at 
the hour appointed for beginning a game. The 
game must begin when the Umpire calls " Play." 
When he calls " Time," play shall be suspended 
until he calls " Play "again, and during the inter- 
im no player shall be put out, base be run, or run 
be scored. The Umpire shall suspend play only 
for an accident to himself or a player ; (but in case 
of accident to a Fielder, Time shall not be called 
until the ball be returned to and held by the 



5G 



PLAYING RULES. 



Pitcher, standing in his position) ; or in case 
rain falls so heavily that the spectators are com- 
pelled, by the severity of the storm, to seek shel- 
ter, in which case he shall note the time of sus- 
pension, and, should such rain continue to fall 
thirty minutes thereafter, he shall terminate the 
game. The Umpire shall also declare every " Dead 
Ball," "Block," "Foul Hit," "Foul Strike," 
" Balk "and " Foul Balk." 

RULE 50. The Batsman , on taking his posi- 
tion, must call for a" High Ball, "a " Low Ball, "or 
a " High or Low Ball," and the Umpire shall no- 
tify the Pitcher to deliver the ball as required ; 
such call shall not be changed after the first ball 
delivered. The Umpire shall count and call ev- 
ery '■ Unfair Ball " delivered by the Pitcher, and 
every " Foul Balk " and " Dead Ball," if also an 
" Unfair Ball, " as a" Ball; " and he shall also count 
and call every M Strike. " Neither a " Ball " nor a 
" Strike " shall be called counted until the ball has 
passed the Home Base. 

RULE 51. The Batsman is out 

(1) If he fails to take his position at the bat 
in his order of batting, unless the error be discov- 
ered and the proper Batsman takes his position 
before a fair hit has been made, and in such case 
the balls and strikes called will be counted in the 
time at bat of the proper Batsman. 

(2) If he fails to take his position within one 
minute after the Umpire has called for the Bats- 
man. 



HHIHI 



PLAYING RULES. 



5? 



(3) If he makes a Foul Hit, and the ball be 
momentarily held by a fielder before touching the 
ground, provided it be not caught in a fielder's hat 
or cap, or touch some object other than the fielder 
before being caught. 

(4) If he makes a Foul Strike. 

(5) If he plainly attempts to hinder the 
Catcher from fielding the ball, evidently without 
effort to make a fair hit. 

RULE 52. The Batsman becomes a Base Run- 
ner 

(1) Instantly after he makes a Fair Hit. 

(2) Instantly after seven Balls have been 
called by the Umpire. 

(3) Instantly after three Strikes have been 
declared by the Umpire. 

(4) Instantly after two Foul Balks have been 
declared by the Umpire, 

Rule 53. The Base-Runner must touch each 
Base in regular order, viz. : First, Second, Third 
and Hpme Bases, and when obliged to return, 
must do so on the run, and must retouch the 
base or bases in reverse order. He shall only be 
considered as holding a base after touching it, 
and shall then be entitled to hold such base until 
he has legally touched the next base in order, or 
has been legally forced to vacate it for a succeed- 
ing Base-Runner. 

Rule 54. The Base- Runner shall be entitled, 
without being put out, to take one Base, provided 
he do so on the run, in the following cases: 

(1) If, while he was Batsman, the Umpire 
called seven Balls. 

\ 



I I 



fl U fr — w* 



58 



PLAYING RULES. 



(2) If the Umpire awards a succeeding Bats- 
man a base on seven balls, and the Base-Runner 
is thereby forced to vacate the base held by him. 

(3) If the Umpire calls a Balk. 

I (4) If the Umpire calls two Foul Balks. \ 

(5) If a ball delivered by the Pitcher pass the 
Catcher and touch any fence or building within 
ninety feet of the Home Base. 

(6.) If he be prevented from making a base 
by the obstruction of an adversary. 

(7) If a Fielder stop or catch a batted ball 
with his hat or any part of his dress. 

Rule 55. The Base Runner shall return to 
Ids Base, and shall be entitled to so return with- 
out being put out, provided he do so on the run. 

(1) If the Umpire declares a Foul Hit, and the 
ball be not legally caught by a Fielder. 

(2) If the Umpire declares a Foul Strike. 

(3) If the Umpire declares a Dead Ball, un- 
less it be also the seventh Unfair Ball, and he be 
thereby forced to take the next base, as provided 
in Rule 54 (2). 

RULE 56. The Base Runner shall not have a 
substitute run for him. 

Rule 57. The Base Runner is out: 
(1) If, after three Strikes have been declared 
against him while Batsman, and the Catcher fails 
to catch the third-strike ball, he plainly attempts 
to hinder the Catcher from fielding the ball. 



-•■• ■•-....... ■ 



mm 



PLAYING RULES. 



50 



(2) If, having made a Fair Hit while Batsman, 
such fair-hit ball be momentarily held by a Fielder, 
before touching the ground or any object other 
than a Fielder: Provided, it be not caught in the 
Fielder's hat or cap. 

(3) If, when the Umpire has declared three 
Strikes on him while Batsman, the third-strike ball 
be momentarily held by a Fielder before touching 
the ground : Provided, it be not caught in a 
Fielder's hat or cap, or touch some object other 
than a Fielder before being caught. 

(4) If, after three Strikes or a Fair Hit, he be 
touched with the ball in the hand of a Fielder 
before such Base-Runner touches First Base. 

(5) If, after three Strikes or a Fair Hit, the 
ball be securely held by a Fielder, while touching 
First Base with any part of his person, before 
such Base Runner touches First Base. 

(6) If, immediately after three strikes, seven 
balls, or a fair hit, he fails to run to First Base. 

(7) If, in running the last half of the distance 
from Home Base to First Base, he runs outside 
the Three-Feet Lines, as defined in Rule 1 1 , except 
that he must do so if necessary to avoid a Fielder 
attempting to field a batted ball, and in such case 
shall not be declared out. 

(8) If, in running from First to Second Base, 
from Second to Third Base, or from Third to Home 
Base, he runs more than three feet from a direct 
line between such bases to avoid being touched 
by the ball in the hands of a Fielder; but in case 
a Fielder be occupying the Base-Runner's proper 



•■■■• ■ -■ ■ 



60 



PLAYING RULES. 



path, attempting to field a batted ball, then the 
Base-Runner shall run out of the path and behind 
said Fielder, and shall not be declared out for so 
doing. 

(9) If he fails to avoid a Fielder attempting 
to field a batted ball, in the manner prescribed in 
(7) and (8) of this Rule, or if he, in any way, ob- 
structs a Fielder attempting to field a batted ball: 
Provided, that if two or more Fielders attempt to 
field a batted ball, and the Ease-Runner comes in 
contact with one or more of them, the Umpire 
shall determine which Fielder is entitled to the 
benefit of this Rule, and shall not decide the Base- 
Runner out for coming in contact with any other 
Fielder. 

(10) If, at any time while the ball is in play, 
he be touched by the ball in the hand of a Fielder, 
unless some part of his person is touching a base 
he is entitled to occupy, provided the ball be 
held by the Fielder after touching him; but {ex- 
ception as to First Base) in running to Frst Base 
he may overrun said base without being put out 
for being off said base, after first touching it, 
provided he returns at once and retouches the 
base, after which he may be put out as at any 
other base. If, in overrunning First Base, he also 
attempts to run to Second Base, he. shall forfeit 
such exemption from being put out. 

(11) If, when "a Fair or Foul Hit ball is legally 
caught by a Fielder, such ball is legally held by a 
Fielder on the base occupied by the Base-Runner 
when such ball was struck (or the Base-Runner 
be touched with the ball in the hand of a Fielder), 



mj wh i m 



PLAYING RULES. 



61 



before he retouches said base after such Fair or 
Foul Hit ball was so caught: Provided that the 
Base-Runner shall not be out in such case, if, after 
the ball was legally caught as above, it be deliv- 
ered to the bat by the Pitcher before the Fielder 
holds it on said base, or touches the Base-Runner 
with it. 

(12) If, when a Batsman becomes a Base - 
Runner {except as provided in Rule 54), the 
First Base, or the First and Second Bases, or the 
First, Second and Third Bases, be occupied, any 
Base-Runner so occupying a base shall cease to 
be entitled to hold it, until any following Base- 
Runner is put out, and may be put out at 
the next base or by being touched by the ball in 
the hands of a Fielder in the same manner as in 
running to First Base, at any time before any 
following Base-Runner is put out. 

(13) If a Fair Hit ball strike him, he shall 
'be declared out, and in such case no base shall 

be run unless forced, and no run be scored. 

(14) If, when running to a base or forced to 
return to a base, he fail to touch the intervening 
base or bases, if any, in the order prescribed in 
Rule S3, he may be put out at the base he fails to 
touch, or by being touched by the ball in the hand 
of a Fielder, in the same manner as in running 
to First Base: Provided, That he shall not be 
declared out unless the Captain of the fielding 
side claim such decision before the ball is deliv- 
ered to the bat by the Pitcher^ 



ex 



PLAYING RULES. 



(IS) If, when the Umpire calls " Play," after 
any suspension of a game, he fails to return to 
and touch the base he occupied when " Time " 
was called, before touching the next base. 

RULE 58. The Umpire shall declare the Bats- 
man or Base- Runner out, without zvaiting for an 
appeal for such decision , in all cases where such 
player is put out in accordance with these rules, 
except as provided in Rule 57, (11,) (14) and 

(15.) 

RULE 59. In case of a Foul Strike, Foul Hit 
not legally caught flying. Dead Ball, or Base- 
Runner put out for being struck by a fair-hit ball, 
the ball shall not be considered in play until it is 
held by the Pitcher standing in his position. 

RULE 60. Whenever a Block occurs , the Um- 
pire shall declare it, and Base-Runners may run 
the bases without being put out, until after the 
ball has been returned to and held by the Pitcher 
standing in his position. 

RULE 61 . One Run shall be scored every time 
a Base-Runner, after having legally touched the 
first three bases, shall touch tile Home Base be- 
fore three men are put out. If the third man is 
forced out, or is put out before reaching First 
Base, a run shall not be scored. 

RULE 62. If the Pitcher causes the ball to 
strike the Batsman, and the Umpire be satisfied 
that he does it intentionally, he shall fine the 
Pitcher therefor in a sum not less than Ten Dol- 
lars, nor more than Fifty Dollars. (See League 
contract, paragraph II.) 



PLAYING RULES. 



63 



RULE 6$. No Player except the Cap tarn or 
his assistant shall address the Umpire concerning 
any point of play, and any violation of this Rule 
shall subject the offender to a fine by the Um- 
pire. 

CLASS VI. 

Rule 64. A staff of four League umpires 
shall be elected at the Schedule meeting of the 
League, in the month of March, on the following 
basis : 

(1) Applications for such positions will be re- 
ceived by the Secretary until the first day of 
March. 

(2) A written contract shall be made with 
each of the four umpires selected, stipulating for 
his service from May 1st to Oct. 1st, at a salary 
of one thousand dollars for such period , payable 
in equal monthly payments, at the expiration of 
each month of service. He shall also be allowed 
and paid his actual expenses while absent from 
his home in the service of the League. 

(3) He shall be under the sole control and di- 
rection of the Secretary, from whom he will re- 
ceive all assignments to duty and all instructions 
regarding the interpretation of the playing rules, 
and the Secretary shall see that he is proficient in 
the discharge of his duties, and that he shall ap- 
pear in proper dress when acting as umpire. 

(4) In the event of the failure of such umpire 
to umpire a game assigned to him, it shall be the 
duty of the Secretary to provide a subutitute to 






64 



PLAYING RULES. 



umpire such game, and, in such case, there shall 
be deducted from the next monthly payment to 
the League umpire the sum of twelve dollars for 
each game assigned to him, which, for any rea- 
son, he shall have failed to umpire. 

(5) It shall be the duty of each League club 
to accept as umpire for any championship game 
such League umpire or substitute as the Secre- 
tary shall assign to such game, and only in the 
event of the failure of the League umpire or sub- 
stitute so assigned to appear at the hour appoint- 
ed for the beginning of such game, shall the duty 
devolve upon the visiting club to designate an 
umpire for such game. 

(6) Any League umpire shall be removed who 
shall be objected to in writing by four League 
clubs after the commencement of the champion- 
ship season, and, in the event of the resignation, 
removal or expulsion of any League umpire the 
Secretary shall have power to appoint a suitable 
person to fill the vacancy thus created. 

RULE 65. The Umpires Duties, In addition 
to those specified in the preceding Rules, are : 

(1) Before the commencement of a Match 
Game, the Umpire shall see that the rules gov- 
erning all the materials of the^ game are strictly, 
observed. He shall ask the Captain of the Home 
Club whether there are any special ground rules 
to be enforced, and, if there are, he shall see that 
they are duly enforced, provided they do not 
conflict with any of these Rules, He shall also 
ascertain whether the fence in the rear of the 
Catcher's position is distant ninety feet from the 
Home Base. 



PLAYING RULES. 



65 



The Umpire shall not reverse his decision on 
any point of play upon the testimony of any 
player engaged in the game or upon the testi- 
mony of any bystander. 

(2) It shall be the duty of the umpire to de- 
cide whether the grounds are in proper condition 
and the weather suitable for play. 

RULE 66. The Umpire shall not be changed 
during the progress of a match game, except for 
reason of illness or injury. 

RULE 67. Any League Umpire who shall be 
convicted of selling, or offering to sell, a game of 
which he is Umpire, shall thereupon be removed 
from his official capacity and placed under the 
same disabilitiesjnflicted on expelled players by 
the Constitution of the League. (See, also, Con- 
stitution, Section 45.) 

RULE 6$. The Umpire's Jurisdictions and 
Potvers, in addition to those specified in the pre- 
ceding Rules, are : 

(1) The gentleman selected to fill the posi- 
tion of Umpire must keep constantly in mind the 
fact that upon his sound discretion and prompt- 
ness in conducting the game, compelling players 
to observe the spirit as well as the letter of the 
Rules, and enforcing each and every one of the 
Rules, largely depends the merit of the game as 
an exhibition, and the satisfaction of spectators 
therewith. He must make his decisions distinct 
aad clear, remembering that every spectator is 
anxious to hear- such decision. He must keep 
the contesting nines playing constantly from the 
commencement of the game to its termination, 



66 



PLAYING RULES. 



allowing such delays only as are rendered un- 
avoidable by accident, injury or rain. He must, 
until the completion of the game, require the 
players of each side to promptly take their posi- 
tions in the field as soon as the third hand is put 
out, and must require the first striker of the op- 
posite side to be in his position at the bat as 
soon as the fielders are in their places. 

(2) The players of the side " at bat H must 
occupy the portion of the field allotted them, 
subject to the condition that they must speedily 
vacate any portion thereof that may be in the 
way of the ball, or any fielder attempting to 
catch or field it. The triangular space behind 
the Home Base is reserved for the exclusive use 
of the Umpire, Catcher and Batsman, and the 
Umpire must prohibit any player of the side " at 
bat " from crossing the same at any time while 
the ball is in the hands of the Pitcher or Catcher, 
or is passing between them, while standing in 
their positions. 

' (3) Section 9 of the League Constitution 
makes the League Umpire a member of the 
League. During the progress of a game he 
is the sole representative of the League, to see 
that the game is played and determined solely on 
its merits, and these Rules invest him with am- 
ple powers to accomplish this purpose. In the 
performance of his duties he must remember that 
his sole allegiance is due to the League. 

(4) The Umpire is master of the Field from the 
commencement to the termination of the game, 



PLAYING RULES. 



67 



and must compel the players to observe the pro- 
visions of all the Playing Rules, and he is hereby 
invested with authority to order any Player to 
do or omit to do any act, as he may deem it 
necessary to give force and effect to any and all 
of such provisions, and power to inflict upon any 
player disobeying any such order a fine of not 
less than five nor more than fifty dollars for each 
offense, and to impose a similar fine upon any 
player who shall use abusive, threatening or im- 
proper language to the Umpire, audience, or 
other player, and when the Umpire shall have so 
punished the player, he shall not have the power 
to revoke or remit the penalty so inflicted. (See 
League Contract, paragraph n.) 

(5) The Umpire shall, at once, notify the Cap- 
tain of the offending player's side of the infliction 
of any fine herein provided for, and the club to 
which such player belongs shall, upon receipt of 
a notice of said fine from the Secretary of the 
League, within ten days transmit the amount of 
such fine to the Secretary of the League. 

(6) In case the Umpire imposes a fine on a 
player, or declares a game forfeited, he shall 
transmit a written notice thereof to the Secretary 
of the League within twenty-four hours there- 
after; and if he shall fail to do so, he shall forfeit 
his position as League Umpire, and shall forever 
thereafter be ineligible to umpire any League 
game. 

Rule 69. For the special benefit of the pat- 
rons of the Game, and because the offenses speci- 
fied are under his immediate jurisdiction, and not 







.-««»,'*.'. 



68 



PLAYING RULES. 



subject to appeal by players, the attention of the 
Umpire is particularly directed to possible viola- 
tions of the purpose and spirit of the Rules, of 
the following character : 

1. Laziness or loafing of players in taking 
their places in the field, or those allotted them 
by the Rules when their side is at bat, and espe- 
cially any failure to keep the bats in the racks 
provided for them ; to be ready (two men) to 
take position as Batsman, and to remain upon the 
Players' Bench except when otherwise required 
by the Rules. 

2. Any attempt by players of the side at bat, 
by calling to a fielder other than the one desig- 
nated by his Captain, to field a ball, or by any 
other equally disreputable means seeking to dis- 
concert a fielder. 

3. Indecent or improper language addressed 
by a player to the audience, the Umpire, or any 
player. 

In any of these cases the Umpire should 
promptly fine the offending player. 

4. The Rules make a marked distinction be- 
tween hindrance of an adversary in fielding a 
batted or a thrown ball. This has been done to 
rid the game of the childish excuses and claims 
formerly made by a Fielder failing to hold a ball 
to put out a Base- Runner, but there may be 
cases of a Base-Runner so flagrantly violating 
the spirit of the Rules and of the Game in ob- 
structing a Fielder from fielding a thrown ball, 
that it would become the duty of the Umpire not 
only to declare the Base-Runner " out" (and to 



PLAYING RULES. 



69 



compel any succeeding Base-Runners to hold their 
bases), but also to impose a heavy fine upon him. 
For example: If the Base-Runner plainly strike 
the ball while passing him, to prevent its being 
caught by a Fielder ; if he hold a Fielder's arms 
so as to disable him from catching the ball, or if 
he knock the Fielder down with his fist for the 
same purpose. 

5. In the case of a " Block", if the person not 
engaged in the game should retain possession of 
the ball, or throw or kick it beyond the reach of 
the Fielders, the Umpire should call "Time," 
and require each Base-runner to stop at the last 
base touched by him, until the ball be returned 
to the Pitcher, standing in his position. 

6. The Umpire must call " Play " at the exact 
time advertised for beginning a game, and any 
player not then ready to take the position allotted 
him must be promptly fined by the Umpire. 

7. The Umpire is only allowed, by the Rules, 
to call " Time " in case of an accident to himself 
or a player, or in case of rain, as defined by the 
Rules. The practice of players suspending the 
game to discuss or contest a decision with the 
Umpire, is a gross violation of the Rules, and the 
Umpire should promptly fine any player who in- 
terrupts the game in this manner.. 



CLASS VII 

SCORING. 
RULE 70. In Order to Promote Uniformity in 
Scoring Championship Games, the following in- 
structions, suggestions and definitions are made 



ro 



PLAYING RULES. 



for the benefit of scorers of League clubs, and 
they are required to make the scores mentioned 
in Section 80 of the League Constitution in ac- 
cordance therewith. 
Batting, 

(1) The first item in the tabulated score, after 
the player's name and position, shall be the num- 
ber of times he has been at bat during the game. 
Any time or times where the player has been 
sent to base on called balls shall not be included 
in this column. 

(2) In the second column should be set down 
the runs made by each player. 

(3) In the third column should be placed the 
first base hits made by each player. A base hit 
should be scored in the following cases : 

When the ball from the bat strikes the ground 
between 
fielders. 



the foul lines, and out of reach of the 



When a hit is partially or wholly stopped by a 
fielder in motion, but such player cannot recover 
himself in time to handle the ball before the 
striker reaches First Base. 

When the ball is hit so sharply to an inficlder 
that he cannot handle it in time to put out a man. 
In case of doubt over this class of hits, score a 
base hit and exempt fielder from the charge of 
an error. 

When a ball is hit so slowly toward a fielder 
that he cannot handle it in time to put out a man. 



PLAYING RULES. 



71 



(4) In the fourth column should be placed to 
the credit of each player the total bases made by 
him off his hits. 

Fielding 

(5) The number of opponents put out by 
each player shall be set down in the fifth column. 
Where a striker is given out by the Umpire for a 
foul strike, or because he struck out of his turn 
the put-out shall be scored to the Catcher. 

(6) The number of times the player assists 
shall be set down in the sixth column. An as- 
sist should be given to each player who handles 
the ball in a run-out or other play of the kind. 

An assist should be given to a player who 
makes a play in time to put a runner out, even if 
the player who should complete the play fails, 
through no fault of the player assisting. 

And generally an assist should be given to 
each player who handles the bail from the time it 
leaves the bat until it reaches the player who 
makes the put-out, or in case of a thrown ball, 
to each player who throws or handles it cleanly, 
and in such a way that a put-out results or would 
result if no error were made by the receiver. 

In the summary of the game should be credited 
to the pitcher the number of times a batsman 
fails to hit the ball on the third strike. 

(7) An error should be given for each mis- 
play which allows the striker or base-runner to 




n 



PLAYING RULES. 



make one or more bases, when perfect play- 
would have insured his being put out. 

An error should be given to the Pitcher when 
the batsman is given first base on " called balls." 

In scoring errors off batted balls, see (3) of this 
rule. 

CLASS VIII. 

CONSTRUCTION AND AMENDMENTS. 
Rule 71. No section of these Rules shall be 
construed as conflicting with or affecting any 
article of the Constitution of the League, 

RULE 72. No Amendment or change of any 
of these Rules shall be made, except in the man- 
ner provided in the Constitution of the League. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



73 



Special Meeting of the National League of Profes- 
sional Base Ball Clubs held at the Continental 
Hotel, Philadelphia, Pa., Friday, Sept. 22d, a. d 
1882. 
Present: 

5 ' A. J H Ch°se N ( ^presenting Boston B. B. Ass'n. 



Hon. W. G. Thompson 
Mr. A. L. Hotchkin 
Mr. Geo. W. Howe 
Mr. Fred Simester 
Mr. H. B. Winship 
Mr. James Moffat 
Mr. A. G. Spalding 



Detroit 

Troy City " " 

Cleveland " " 

Worcester ** ** 

Providence ci " 

Buffalo " Club. 
Chicago Ball " 
Meeting called to order at 11 a. ar., by President Soden, 
who spoke very feelingly of the circumstances which called him 
to the chair by the death of President Hulbert, and eulo- 
gized the man and his many noble qualities of mind and heart. 
On motion the reading of the minutes of the last meeting 
was dispensed with. 

Mr. Thompson moved that each club be permitted to hire 
any of their own, or players not connected with League Clubs, 
on and after Monday, Sept. 25. Carried. 

Mr. Chase moved, as a sense of this meeting, that the 
Buffalo Club has a right to play three schedule games with the 
Chicago Club in either Chicago, New York, or Philadelphia. 
Carried. 

It was moved and seconded that the Chicago and Providence 
Clubs, in case of a tie for the championship, be permitted to 
play a series of not more than nine games as a test of superi- 
ority. Carried. 

On motion adjourned subject to the call of the President. 
(Signed) * J A. H. SODEN, 

N. E. YOUNG, President. 

Secretary. 

Meeting of the Board of Directors of the National 
League of Professional Base Ball Clubs held at 
Hotel Dorrance, Providence, R. I., Tuesday, Dec. 5, 
a. d. 1882. 
Meeting called to order by the chairman at 8.30 p. m. 
Present: 

Mr. A. H. Soden, Chairman, and Messrs. Thompson, 
Hotchkin, and Hughson, Directors. (The latter representing 
the Buffalo Club in the absence of Mr. Jewett.) 
The report of the Treasurer was received and accepted. 
Mr. N. E. Young was re-elected Secretary of the League. 
On motion adjourned to meet at 0:30 a. m., on the following 
day. 



HihtaS 




74 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 



Wednesday, Dec. 6., A. D. 1882. 
Meeting called to order at 9 130 A. m. 

Present: Mr. A. H. Soden, Chairman, and Messrs. 
Brown, Thompson, Hotchkin and Hughson, Directors. 

The Secretary presented a tabular statement of champion- 
ship games won and lost during the season of 1S82, showing 
the Chicago Club to have won the greatest number . 
On motion, the following resolution was adopted : 
Resolved, That the Chicago Ball Club of Chicago, III., 
having won the greatest number of games in the championship 
series, is hereby awarded the League Championship of the 
United States for the year 1882. 

In connection with the subject of the championship we find 
that several games were played by four League Clubs after the 
conclusion of the championship season, in pursuance of an 
agreement made by representatives of six (6) League Clubs. 
Under the present Constitution of the League such games can 
have no place in the championship record, but w r e recommend 
such legislation as will provide for a special series to determine 
the championship in case two or more clubs be found tied 
for first place on games won and lost at the conclusion of the 
series covered by the annual championship schedule. 

We have the pleasure of reporting that an appropriate me- 
morial stone, commemorating the connection of our late Presi- 
dent, Mr. W. A. Hulbert, with the League, has been provid- 
ed for by equal contributions of all the clubs that were members 
of the League at the time of his death, and that it is now in 
course of preparation and will probably be erected during the 
present month. 

In the matter of charges and specifications preferred by the 
Cleveland Club against Herman Doscher, on motion of 
Mr. Thompson the appeal of Mr. Doscher was dismissed, 
and the action of the Cleveland Club in suspending said 
Doscher for the year 1883 was unanimously affirmed. 

On motion of Mr. Thompson the Buffalo Club was 
awarded one hundred ($100) dollars to be paid by the Metro- 
politan Club for game of date Oct. 6, 1882. 

On motion adjourned, 

(Signed) A. H. Soden, Chairman. 

" A. L. Hotchkin, 1 

Geo. H. Hughson, I D j rect ™ 
W.G.Thompson, ^ irectors » 
« Freeman Brown, J 



• 



BASE BALL GUIBE. 



75 



Annual Meeting of the National League o# Profes- 
sional Base Ball Clubs held at Hotel Dorrance, 
Providence, R. I., Wednesday, Dec. 6, A. D. 1882. 
Meeting called to order by the President at 12 m. 
The following named gentlemen presented their credentials: 
A. H. Soden representing the Boston B. B. Ass'n 

A. J. Chase 



H. B. Winship 
H. Wright 
C. H. Bulkley 
Geo. W. Howe 
A. G. Spalding 
A. G. Mills 
A. L, Hotchkin 
Freeman Brown 
Hon. W. G. Thompson 
Geo. H. Hughson 



Providence " « 

it K u 

Cleveland '« ** 

« (I tt 

Chicago Ball Club. 

Troy City B. B. Ass'n 
Worcester ' ' Club. 
Detroit 4t Ass'n. 

Buffalo " Club. 



■ On motion the regular order of business was suspended. 
Mr, A. G. Mills offered the following resolutions which were 
unanimously adopted : 

Resolved, That by the death of our friend and former Pres- 
ident, Mr. W. A. Hulbert, the National game and this 
League have alike suffered an irreparable loss. 

Resolved, That to him alone is due the credit of having 
founded this League, and to his able leadership, sound judg- 
ment and impartial management, are chiefly due the success it 
has thus far attained, and the substantial reforms which have 
been effected in the exhibition of the National game since the 
organization of this League. 

Resolved, That we honor his name and will ever cherish his 
memory, and will endeavor, in the conduct of the affairs of this 
League, to pursue the line of policy which he inaugurated 

Resolved, That these resolutions be inscribed upon the min- 
utes of this meeting, and that a copy be furnished Mr. Hul- 
bert's family with"' the assurance of our profound sympathy 
with them in their bereavement. 

Remarks were made by Messrs. Mills, Young, and others. 
The regular order of business being resumed, on motion the 
reading of the minutes of the last meeting was dispensed 
with. 

The resignations of the Worcester B. B. Club and the 
Troy City B. B. Ass'n were received, and, on motion, the 
following resolutions were unanimously adopted: 

Resolved, That the resignations of the Worcester B. B. 
Club, and the Troy City B. B. Association, are hereby ac- 
cepted, and that the names of said clubs be placed on the roll 
of honorary League membership. 









76 



spalding's official 



Resolved, That the representatives of the Worcester and 
Troy City Clubs be invited to be present during the remain- 
der of this annual meeting. 

The Secretary presented the applications for League mem- 
bership of the New York Ball Club of New York City, 
and the Philadelphia Ball Club of Philadelphia, Pa., 
accompanied with the unanimous favorable report of the com- 
mittee to whom they had been previously referred. Upon a 
ballot being passed they were duly elected. Jno. B. Day and 
C. T. Dillingham were admitted as the representatives of the 
former, and A. J. Reach as the representative of the latter 
club. 

The meeting next proceeded to consider amendments to the 
Constitution, pending the consideration of which on motion* 
adjourned to meet at 10 A. m. on the following day. 

Thursday, Dec. 7, A. D. 1SS2. 

Meeting called to order at 10 a. m., and proceeded to the con- 
sideration of amendments to the Constitution and Playing 
Rules, which, as amended, were adopted as follows: 

(See Constitution and Playing Rules.) 

The following preamble and resolution was adopted: 

Whereas, The Northwestern League has invited this 
League to arrange a basis for the mutual recognition of con- 
tracts, and 

Whereas, This League has accepted such invitation, There- 
ore 

Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed by this 
meeting to confer upon this and other subjects of mutual in- 
terest, with such association, or with any other association of 
Base Ball Clubs, said committee to report to the League meet- 
ing in March. 

The following named gentlemen were selected to constitute 
such committee: Messrs. A. G. Mills, Jno. B. Day, and A. 
II . Soden. 

On motion the names of the following persons were removed 
from the list of disqualified players, Viz: S. P. I Iouck, Lip- 
man Pike, L. P. Dickerson, M, J. Dorgan, J. J. Fox, Ed- 
ward Nolan, Wm, Crowley, E. M. Gross, L. J. Brown, 
and E. J. Caskins. 

On motion the disabilities of Jno. E. Clapp were removed. 

On motion the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the President of the League is hereby em- 
powered to reconvene this annual meeting at any time in 
March, 1SS3. 

On motiou the following resolution was adopted: 

Resolved, That the next annual meeting of the League be 
held at Washington, D. C. 



)1 



m 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



77 



Messrs. A. H. Soden and A. G. Spalding were selected as 
a committee to prepare a Schedule for the season of 18S3, 

On motion, the publication of the League Book was left in 
the hands of the Secretary. 

On motion a committee of three was appointed to consider 
the matter of uniforms. 

Messrs. Bulkley, Day and Wright were appointed to 
constitute such committee, who reported in favor of the clubs 
named being permitted to wear the colored stockings selected 
by them as follows: Boston, Red, Chicago, White, Detroit, 
Brown, Buffalo, Gray, Cleveland, Navy Blue, Provi- 
dence, Light Blue. Also of allowing the New York and 
Philadelphia clubs to select their own colors prior to the com- 
mencement of the season, which should be distinctive and not 
in conflict with any of the colors selected by the above named 
clubs. 

The report of the committee was accepted and the committee 
discharged. 

Mr. A. H. Soden was appointed a committee to receive bids 
from manufacturers present for furnishing the necessary num- 
ber of balls for the use of the League during the year 1SS3. 

The "Spalding League Ball" was selected, and the con- 
tract for furnishing the same duly awarded to Messrs. A. G. 
Spalding & Bros., Chicago, III. 

Messrs. Spalding, Reach & Hughson were appointed a 

committee on Printing, and, upon their report and recommenda- 
tion, the contract for printing posters, etc., for the useof League 
clubs during the year 1SS3, was awarded to Mr. J no. B. Sage, 
Buffalo, N. Y. Mr. A. G. Mills was unanimously elected 
President of the League. 

The following resolution was adopted: 

/fesolved, That the thanks of the League are due and are 
hereby tendered to Mr. A. II. Soden for the able and impar- 
tial manner in which he has performed the duties of President. 

The following named gentlemen were elected with the Pres- 
ident, to constitute the "Board of Directors" for the ensu- 
ing year, namely: A. H. Soden, A.J, Reach, Hon. W. G. 
Thompson, and" A. G. Spalding. 

No further business appearing, on motion adjourned. 

(Signed) A. G. MILLS, 

N. E. YOUNG, President 

Secretary. 



78 



Spalding's official 



Reconvened annual meeting of the National League 
of Professional Base Ball Clubs held at the 
Victoria Hotel, New York City, Monday, March 
5 1883. 

The following delegates were present : 



A. G. Spalding, 

Jno, B, Day, 

A.J. Reach & Jno. I, Rogers 

Geo. H. Hughson, 

Hon. W\ G. Thompson, 

Geo. W. Howe, 

Harry Wright, 

A. H*. Soden & A. J. Chase, 



representing the Chicago Ball Club. 
New York " « 
« Phila. » " 

" Buffalo B. B. Club. 

* c Detroit " Ass*n, 

" Cleveland " " 

" Providence (< w 

14 Boston ' " 



Meeting called to order by President Mills at 12:30 p. m. 

The conference committee appointed to confer with other 
associations submitted their report, and, on motion, it was 
unanimously accepted, and the President was duly authorized 
to sign the agreement on behalf of the League. 

Messrs. A. G. Mills, A. H. Soden, and Jno. B. Day were 
appointed an arbitration committee on behalf of the League. 

The following resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That the disabilities of the following named per- 
sons be removed, namely : Alex. McKinnon, Philio Baker, 
C. W. Jones, and J. J. Gerhardt. 

The following amendments were made to the Constitution 
and Playing Rules: 

(See Constitution and Playing Rules). 

Messrs. A. F. Odlin of Lancaster, N. H., S. M. Decker, 
Bradford, Pa., Frank Lane, Nor walk, O., and W. E. Furlong, 
Kansas City, Mo , were duly elected to constitute the staff of 
League umpires for 1883. 

On motion of Mr. Thompson, the following reso»ution was 
adopted: 

Resolved, That Herman Doscher be expelled from the 
League for embezzlement and obtaining money under false 
pretences. 

The committee, consisting of Messrs. A. H. Soden and Al- 
bert G. Spalding, appointed to prepare a schedule for the sea- 
son of 1SS3, submitted their report, which was unanimously 
adopted. 

No further business appearing, on motion adjourued. 



(Signed) 
N. E» Young, 

Secretary. 



A. G. MILLS, 
President 



ISASE BALL GUIDE. 



79 



Special Meeting of the Board of Directors of the Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs 
held at the russell house, detroit, mlch., june 

24, A. D. 1882. 

Present : 

Messrs . W. G. Thompson, Freeman Brown, James A. 
Mugridge and Gardner Earl, Directors. (The two latter 
representing the Buffalo and Troy City Clubs in the ab- 
sence of Messrs. Jewett and Hopkins.) 

In the absence of President Soden and Secretary Young, 
Mr. James A. Mugridge was elected chairman pro tem., and 
Mr. Freeman Brown, Sec'y pro tern. 

President Thompson of the Detroit Club preferred 
charges against Richard High am, League umpire (letter 
marked "A") and in support of same presented the following 
communication, (marked U B.") 

President Thompson by reason of representing the club 
making the charges at issue, was excused from acting with the 
"Board." 

Mr. Richard Higham, against whom the charges were pre- 
ferred, was admitted to the meeting, and an opportunity given 
him to present his defence. 

He denied the authorship of the letter marked "B" and made 
a general denial of all complicity with any person or persons to 
cause any game of ball to res ul t'other wise than on its merits 
under the playing rules. The letter marked "B" having been 
submitted with a letter, the authorship of which Mr. Higham 
acknowledged to be his own, to three of the best handwriting 
experts in Detroit, and being pronounced identical with each 
other, it was 

Resolved^ That the charges preferred by the Detroit Club 
against Richard Higham are fully sustained. 

Resolved^ That the said Richard Higham be forever dis- 
qualified from acting as umpire in any game of ball participated 
in by a League Club. 

On motion, adjourned • 
(Signed.) JAMES A. MUGRIDGE, 

FREEMAN BROWN, Chairman pro tetn. 

Secretary pro tern. 



3*m 



80 Spalding's official 

OFFICERS AJSb PLAYERS. 

The following is an official list of the Officers of the Na- 
tional League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, and Officer, and 
Players of Clubs belonging to the "National League of Pro- 
fessional Base Ball Clubs," and Officers and Players of clubs, 
members thereof, for the season of 18S3, so far as completed, 
March 8, 1883. 

A. G. MILLS, President, No. 92 Liberty St, New York 

City. 

N. E. YOUNG, Secretary, P. O. Box 536, Washington, D, 
C. Telegrams to Second Auditor's Office. 

DIRECTORS. 

A. G. Mills, Chairman, 

A. H. Soden, Boston, Mass. 

A.J. Reach, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hon. W. G. Thompson, Detroit, Mich. 

A. G. Spalding, Chicago, III. 

BOSTON BASE BALL ASSOCIATION, OF BOSTON, 
MASS. 



A. H. Soden, President. 
No. 116 Water SU 
J. J. Burdock, 
S.W.Wise, 
Joseph Horning, 
J. F. Morrill, 
Michael Hines, 



A. J. Chase, Treasurer. 

No. J3 Pearl St. 
J. E. Whitney, 
E. B. Sutton, 
C. G. Buffinton, 
P. R. Radford, 
M. M. Hackett, 



L. P. Brown. 

BUFFALO BASE BALL CLUB OF BUFFALO, N. Y. 

Josiah Jewett, President. Geo. H; IIugiison, Secretary. 

No. 11 White Fire Proof Building. 



Chas. J. Foley, 
II . Richardson, 
J. F. Galvin, 
J. C. Rowe, 
D. W. Force, 



M. J. Kennedy. 



D. Brouthers, 
Geo. Shaffer, 
James O'Rourke, 
J. L. White, 
Geo. H. Derby, 



BASE BALI/ GUIDE. 



;si 



CHICAGO BALL CLUB OF CHICAGO, ILL. 



A. G. Spalding, President 
No. joS Madison St. 
A. C. Anson, 
E.N. Williamson, 
Geo. F. Gore, 
M.J. Kelly, 
L. Corcoran, 



J no. A. Brown, Secretary ', 

No. jo8 Michigan Ave. 
A. Dalrymple, 
F. E. Goldsmith, 
Thomas E. Burns, 
F. S. Flint, 
Fred Pfefter, 



L. C Stock well. 



CLEVELAND BASE BALL ASSOCIATION OF 
CLEVELAND, O. 

C. II- BUCKLEY, President. (Letters to G. W. Howe, V. Pres.) 
No. 6 House Block. 

F. C. Bancroft, Manager. 

p.j.Hotaiing, £r h ¥;?i ,ody ' 

W.B.Phillips, M.Muldoon 

Jacob Evans !«. McCormick, 

4«v.« W fiiwrock Fred Dunlap, 

A.J. Bushing, Hugh Daily, 

C. C. Broughton. 

DETROIT BASE BALL ASSOCIATION OF DE- 
TROIT, MICH. 

Hon W G. Thompson, President, No. 204 Raftdolph St. 
k t> Mn.irk J° se P h F - Farrell, 

q W Trott Geo. E. Weidman, 

r^ A Wood Edward Hanlon, 

gf^S ^ C rp d o^U Urn8 ' 

PROVIDENCE BASE BALL ASSOCIATION OF 
PROVIDENCE, R. L 

Henry B. Winship, President. 

Harry Wright, $ ecretary. 



V. Nava, 
B. GilHgan, 
A. A. Irwin, 
Jeremiah Denny, 



Joseph Start, 
Chas. Radbour\ 
Cliff Carroll, 
P. A. Hines, 




83 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 



J no. Farrell, 
C. H. Robinson, 
H. Wright, 



Chris. Fulmer. 



J. L. Richmond, 
J. P. Cassidy, 
E. Smith, 



NEW YORK 



BALL CLUB OF NEW YORK 
CITY. 



Jno. B. Day, President, No. 121 Maiden Lane. 
Jno. E. Glapp, Jno. Troy, 

M. C Dorgan, P Gillespie, 

Jas. E. O'Neill, Wm Ewing, 

F. Hankinson, M. Welch, 
E. J. Caskins, R. Connor, 

Tno. M. Ward, 



PHILADELPHIA BALL CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA, 
PENNSYLVANIA. 

Albert J. Reach, President \ Jno I. Rogers, Secretary, 



No. 25, So 8th St. 
E. M. Gross, 
Jno. Neagle, 
H. Henderson, 
Fred. Lewis, 
W. H. McClellan, 



C. J. Roberts. 



Philadelphia 
W A Purcell, 
Jno. Manning, 
F G Ringo, 
Jno. F Coleman, 
Chas. W. Gaunt, Jr. 



RECORD OF LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



KECORD OF LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES 

Since the Formation of the League in 

1876, to and Including 1882 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR 1876. 



Chicago 

Hartford.. . 
St. Louis... 

Boston 

Louisville.. 

Mutual 

Athletic... 
Cincinnati. 



Games Lost.. 



It 



31 



30 



66 



•jr.;- 2r,r 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR 1877. 



Boston — 

Lnuisvillo 
Hartford.. 
St. Louts.. 
Chicago... 



Games Lost.. 



20 



BO 



43 
48 
■is 
■\A 
v 48 

240 



120 120 



Es* 1 




84 LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR 1878. 













■L 








d" 




d 

o 
w 


a 


o 


o 
So 

Gj 




d 

si 


ffi 

Qj 
.§ 

d 


ecd 

6-? 


o 
M 

CD 

i 


m 

m 
| 








M 


La 


a 






3 


71 




w 


o 


£ 


O 


£ 


00 

r>o 


o 

19 


o 






6 


6 


R 


10 


11 


41 
37 


Cincinnati 


6 




9 


10 


4 


8 


Providence . . 


ft 


8 




6 


10 


8 


00 


!W 


33 


Chicago 


4 


2 


6 




8 


10 


fio 


30 


30 


Indianapolis 


2 


8 


2 


4 




8 


60 


30 


24 




1 


4 


4 


2 


■1 




00 
360 


45 
180 


15 




Games Lost | 


19 23 


27 


30 


36 


45 


18o 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR 1879. 





to 

d 

O 


d 
o 

o 


o 

bD 

o 


d 


a 

.s 

d 
O 


•a 
d 

sS 

1 
9 

O 

8 
10 
8 
8 

8 

*"*6 

5 


o 
>> 

o 

10 
11 
8 
11 
9 
5 

" 2 


0) 
m 

i 

e 

4 
6 
3 
3 

1 
4 


tn-d 

pftl 

78 
78 
76 
76 
74 

75 
42 

576 


0Q 

o 

QQ 

§ 

O 

23 

29 
32 
32 
86 

53 
56 
27 

288 


d 
o 

a 

O 


Providence 




8 

■"8 
3 
5 
2 
1 
2 


7 
4 

""li 
8 
4 
3 

u 


6 
9 
6 

"*3 

4 
1 
3 


10 

7 
3 
7 

*"*4 
2 

3 


55 

49 




4 
6 
6 
2 
4 
2 



Chieago 


41 


Buffalo 


<1l 


Cincinnati 


38 
21 


Troy City 


19 


Syracuse 


15 






Games Lost 


23 


29 


32! 3 J 


36 


53 


56 


27 


288 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR 1880 





d 

I 

O 


8 

d 

| 

s 

Oh 

9 

"*3 
5 

5 
2 
2 

32 


1 

"a! 

1 
O 

8 
9 

'"3 

6 
5 
3 
3 

sr 




2 

10 
7 
9 

7 

i 

1 

42 


g 
O 

10 
6 

5 

... 

9 
3 

43 


d 

a 

CD 

O 

ffl 

9 
7 

7 
5 
8 

"*3 

5 

44 


d 

S 

pq 

11 
10 
9 
11 
3 
9 

66 


d 
d 
'0 
d 

10 
10 
9 

10 
8 
7 
5 

~59 


CD-d 

1-2 

a* 

84 
81 

&3 
83 

81 
82 
80 

664 


00 

m 
32 

;•,;• 

42 

■13 
44 

58 
59 

m 


m 

OF 


Chicago. 


67 


Providence 


8 

•1 
2 
2 
3 

1 
2 

17 


52 


Cleveland 


47 


Troy City 


41 


Worcester 


40 


Boston 


40 


Buffalo 


24 


Cincinnati, 


21 


Games Lost 


332 



BASE BALL OUlDB. 



85 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR 1881. 





o 




d 




5 


d 


•a 


m 

17. 






00 










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o 


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o . 






o 


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aij^ 


ed O 


ziP 




O 


Ph 


ffl 


p 


H 


P5 


Q 


OP* 


0^ 


o& 


Chicago 




9 


7 


7 


H 


10 


ft 


9 


84 


28 


56 


Providence 


3 




5 


8 


« 




9 


9 


84 


37 


47 


Buffalo 


5 


7 




n 


3 


8 


7 


6 


83 


38 


45 


Detroit 


5 


4 


3 




7 


8 


7 


7 


84 


•l:> 


41 




4 


r> 


9 


5 




n 


ft 


4 


84 


45 


39 




2 
6 
3 

28 


5 
3 
3 

3T 


4 
5 
5 

~38 


4 
5 

43 


7 
« 

45 


""a 
s 

45 


8 
"*5 

48| 


8 
7 

50 


83 
84 
82 

668 


SH 




48 36 
50 1 32 


Worcester 


Gaines Lost 


334 


334 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES FOR 1882. 







O 

a 






5 




* 












M 


<D 


o 


a 


U 


£5 





00 




03 T3 


00 


DO 




O 








V 









0) O) 








o 


> 


it! 


ui 


> 


ft 


>> 






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B "S 


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S 




P 








& 




«3-J 


nj 


08 s£ 




O 


Ph 


« 


W 


U 

9 

8 
6 

7 

7 


M 

~8 
9 
5 
8 
4 


H 

9 
9 
6 
4 
9 
8 


9 
10 
11 

7 
11 
9 


84 
84 
84 
81 
82 
83 


29 
32 
39 
39 
40 
41 


o£ 


Chicago 




8 

"*6 
6 
4 
3 


6 
6 

—J 

6 

7 


6 
6 
5 

""5 

4 


Rfi 


Providence 


4 

6 
6 
3 
4 


52 


Buffalo. . 


45 




45 




42 


Detroit.. ■ 


42 


Troy Citv ■ 


3 

3 

29 


3 
2 

32 


6 

1 

39 


8 
5 

39 


2 

1 

40 


4 
3 

41 


*"3 

48 


9 

66 


83 
84 

668 


48 
66 

334 


35 




18 




334 



From the above figures we find that 

Since the organization of the League in 1876, the Chicago Club has won 
tho Championship four years, Boston two, and Providence one. The 
Chicago Club lost the fewest number of games in 1876, and won the 
greatest number in 1880. The Cincinnati Club won tho fewest number of 
games in 1876, and Worcester lost tho most in 1882. The Chicago and 
Bostons are tho only members of tho League who have continued their 
membership since its organization in 1876, and one of these two clubs has 
carried off the Championship honors every year, except 1879, when it was 
won by Providence, Boston standing second, and Chicago third. 




§6 BATTING AVERAGES OP PLAYERS. 

EATTING AVERAGES OF PLAYERS 

Who have taken part in League Championship 

Games for three or more seasons. 

187S to 1332 BOTH II>TOijXrSIVS. 









Oi 






n 

s 








S 






« . 






a 


en 






Sta 






o 
I 









23 pq 


NAME. 




33 


O 


*i 




u~t mi 
O to 






4-t 




PQ 




?_■ at 






o . 







la 

or-" 






a, a; 


u 

9 


"5 






A4 

a 


fl 


| 


1 








K 


£ 


*A 


H 


£ 


PL) 


Adrian C. Anson 


1 


7 


471 


2005 


733 


.305 


Dennis Bronthere 




2 


:} 


188 


789 


201 


.330 


Calvin A. Mc Vey . 




3 


S 


171 


784 


252 


,321 


James L. White. . 




4 


7 


444 


1891 


000 


.320 


A. Dalrymple. ... 




5 


6 


876 


1713 


547 


.319 


Rodger Connor... 
George F. Gore... 

Joseph Start 

M. J. Kelly 






3 

4 

5 


246 

471 
381 


1040 

[-241 
212:5 


328 
391 
007 
511 


.315 
.315 
.314 
.312 


Paul A. Hines 




9 




501 


•225: J 


ill 


.311 


Roscoe C. Barnes 




10 


4 


...K. 


lit 12 


319 


.309 


James O'Rourke.. 




11 


7 


BIO 


2225 


osi 


,::iii, 


Charles W. Jones 




12 


4 


271 


1163 


317 


.298 


L. P. Bickerson . . 




13 


1 


248 


1085 


318 


.293 


Fred Dunlap 

C.J. Foley 

J. C. Rove 




14 
15 


3 

■1 


241 

2S(i 


1067 

lis:, 


311 
:'.:js 


.291 
,285 




16 


8 


213 


f>70 


2 15 


.281 


Geo. Shaffer 




| 


(i 


427 


1741 


<S0 


.2.9 


Jno. E, Clapp 




ir 


e 


379 


1615 


152 


279 


E. M. Gross 






8 


165 


647 


18] 


>279 


Chas. W. Bennett 




18 


:| 


254 


994 


276 


.278 


Thomas Burns . . . 




19 




250 


1020 


283 


.270 


John A. Peters... 




XW> 


(i 


384 


1700 


468 


. 275 


H. Richardson 




21 


4 


3:2 t 


1357 


371 


,273 


II. D. Stovey 




J 


2 


23!) 


mil 284 


. 272 


Thomas York 






7 


469 


1928 52:1 


,272 


Robert Ferguson . 






7 


153 


1881 


'•' ■ " 


Win. M. Crmvli'y . 




23 


■1 


261 


1008 


• 


James Hallin&n , . 






.: 


S5 


37S 


102.269 


Joseph Horn ung . 




■21 


4 


321 


1353 


864 


.209 


P. J. Ilotaling.... 






4 


316 


1370 


309 


> 269 


Geo. A. Wood . ... 




' 


8 


2*0 


1014 


2 1 2 


.268 


Wm.A.Purcdl... 




25 - 


1 


281 


1205 


= J23 


.20S 


E. N. Williamson 




5 


375 


1.-17 


415 


.208 


John F. Morrill.. 






7 


505 


-y>\:> 


;»i; 


.208 


W.B. Phillips.... 




26 


4 


325 


1372 


365 


.266 


E. B. Sutton 




27 


<' 


481 


1942 


513 


.204 



BATTING AVERAGES OF PLAY»ERS, gy 

BATTING AVERAGES OF PLAYERS— Continues. 



NAME. 



Jno. Farrell 

M. C. Dorgan 

Philip Powers 

P. Gillespie 

Timothy M urn an.. . 

Lewis J. Brown 

Andrew J. Leonard. 

J. P. Cassidy 

M.Welch 

M. J. Kennedy 

J. J. Gerhardt 

Edward llanlon — 

George Wright 

F. S/FIint 

S, P. Houck 

J. W. Glasscock — 

Thomas Carey 

J. Lee Kichmond.... 

Frank Larkin 

JohnM. Ward 

Jno. J. Burdock 

John Manning 

W. A. llarbidge 

F. E. Goldsmith 

John J. Remsen 

M. II. McGeary 

Alonzo Knight 

B. J. Caskins 

David Eggler 

Douglas Allison 

Wm. L.Hague 

Wm. B. Foley 

Geo. W. Bradley 
James McCormick . 

Jacob Evans 

John Nelson 

Thomas II. Bond.. . 

Joseph L. Quest 

James F.Galvin.... 

Chae. Reilly 

F. II. Corey 

Charles N. Snyder. . 
John Richmond 



36 



"A 

I 

4 
3 
3 
8 
5 
•1 



309 1:122 
242 HHI 



371 
079 
603 

1042 
91 

135:2 
635 
:m 

135: 

910 
1-115 

1462 
887 
1296 

i(»i; 

774 
(535 
15* 
2105 
788 
(115 
483 
965 
1155 
1113 
864 
589 
315 
962 
662 
131!) 
1179 
1097 
286 
1150 
1322 
933 
409 
587 
1196 
618 



a« 



f.3 

S u 



.261 
.261 

.260 



.256 
256 
.255 
255 
253 
.251 
.252 
.252 
.251 
.251 
.219 
.247 
.246 
.246 
.245 
.244 
.242 
.241 
.241 
.240 
239 
.339 
.338 
.237 
.237 
.235 
.232 
.232 
.229 
.228 
.327 
.221 
222 
.221 
.220 
230 



1 








gg BATTING AVERAGES OP PLATERS. 


1: 


BATTING AVERAGES OP PLAYERS— CoN-rimiED. 








-d 
























ill 








b 






3 


Sij|l 


\ 




CO 

R 
O 
CD 








en c9 

*2 




NAME. 




CQ 


o 


*J 












o . 


o 


W 


m 
a 
m 


l°a 








a, y 

= >. 


3 




M 


sH 






M 


2 oj 


3 






a> t* - 




• 


a 


£2 


a 


CO 

E 




W. W. Carpenter 


RR 


8 


*M) 


889 


1M 


.218 






59 
GO 
61 
02 
63 
C>1 
65 
66 
67 


8 

4 
5 
G 
6 
4 
4 
3 
3 


15S 
250 
308 
11(1 
286 

180 
177 
181 
186 


631 
867 

11311 
Kill 
1066 
680 

6S8 
065 

683 


138 
-us 
213 
336 
221 
136 
135 
125 
100 


.217 


Frank HankinBon 


.215 




.213 


David W. Force 


.208 


Wm. II. Holbert 


.207 




.200 


Robert Matthews 


.196 




.188 


W. II. White 


.146 


1' 


/ 















■H 



League titters' averages. 39 

BATTING AVERAGES 

Of players who have taken part in fifteen or more Championship Games 
DURING THE SEASON OF 1882. 



M 

a 
a 


NAME. 


CLUB. 


t3 

1 

S 
GO 

<5 
B 

09 

O 


m 

CD 

B 


■:'. 


Jo 


CO* 

CI 

CO 


O CO 

CO <D 

?$& 
— u 


to 



CO 

I P 

3 


a 



No 


t 


Bron the rs 

Anson 

Start . 

Connor . . 

Whitney, J E 

Gore 

Hines 

< Kelly, M. J.. 
1 Foley 

Bennett 

Hornimg 

Dalrvmple... 

Morrill. 

Stovey 

Glasscock . . . 

( O'Ronrke 

< White 

j Williamson. . 

Richmond,JL 

Dunlap 

Purcell 

Ewinff ... 

Richardson . . 

Hayes 

j Deasley 

(York.. 

l Rowe, J. C... 
"(Phillips 

Gillespie 

\ Briody 

} Wood 

Sutton 

{ Farrell, Jno.. 
1 Ferguson 

Hotaling .... 

Muldoon 

Flint... 


Buffalo 


84 
82 
82 
79 

eo 

84 
84 
84 
84 
80 
84 
84 
s-j 
84 
82 
84 
83 
82 
55 
82 
84 
72 
83 
78 
66 
81 
75 
70 
72 
52 
81 
80 
8^ 
71) 
83 
82 
81 
37 
84 
77 
63 
23 


351 
348 
356 
339 
246 
307 
379 
377 
341 
828 
882 
897 
342 
31 ;u 
350 
370 
337 
3is 
228 
856 

OSO 
318 
854 
320 
258 
821 
808 
327 
290 
180 
300 
313 
366 
810 
871 
888 
u8t 

355L 


71 
0! 
58 

03 

48 

73 
81 
51 


084 

O.M 

o.n 

0.79 

0,80 

1.17 

O.f-'O 
O.Cfi 

1) no 


129 
126 
117 
111 
80 
117 
117 
115 
104 
100 
115 
117 
99 
104 
100 
104 
95 
98 
'•1 
99 
105 
87 
96 
88 
69 
86 
82 
87 

49 
95 
80 
93 
79 
94 
84 
83 
85 


.307 
.362 
.328 
.327 
,825 
.318 
.308 
.305 
.305 
304 
301 
.294 
.239 
288 
.285 
.281 
.281 
.281 
.280 
.278 
,278 
.273 
.271 
.209 
.207 
.267 
.200 
.266 
.286 
.203 
.203 
.255 
.254 
.254 
,258 
.252 
.250 
.248 
.247 
.247 
.247 
.247 


194 
175 
141 
179 
129 
154 
177 
104 
142 
150 
151 
107 
148 
152 
156 
142 
119 
144 
98 
125 
141 
131 
137 
130 

125 
111 
129 

93 

61 
150 

90 
138 

!>'■♦ 
119 
128 
129 

43 
123 

98 

94 

33 


2 30 





Chicago 


2 13 


3 
4 

R 


Providence 

Troy City 

Boston 


1.75 
2.26 
2. 15 


6 


Chicago 


1.83 


7 


Providence 

Chicago., 


2.10 
1.95 


8 


Buffalo 


1.69 


It 


Detroit 


■jo'0.50 
or 0.79 
06 1,14 
73 ! 0.fifl 


1.87 


10 


Boston 


1.83 


11 


Chicago 


1.98 


12 


Boston 


1 80 


18 

11 


Worcester 

Cleveland 

Buffalo 


in 
55 

0- 

51 

60 

50 

;.-, 

;:• 
81 
27 

15 

is 
(3 

B 

n 
j" 

it 

17 
U 

;; 
19 
(8 

:3 
-»■» 


1.07 
0.7S 
0.73 
0.01 
0.80 
0.00 
0.79 

0.04 

0.90 
0.73 
0.34 
0.53 
>.59 
0.57 
0.50 
61 
0.55 
0.77 
0.55 

)M 

0.51 

0.77 
0.59 

K.59 

>.*;■• 

3.05 


1.80 
1.90 
1.69 


15 


u 


1.43 




Chicago 


1.75 


16 
M 

is 


Worcester 

Cleveland 

Buffalo 


1.78 
1.52 
1.67 


19 

•JO 


Troy City 

Buffalo 


1 81 
1.65 


21 

32 

23 
21 
25 


Worcester 

Boston 

Providence 

Buffalo 


1.66 
1.16 
1.54 
1.48 


Cleveland 

Troy City 

Cleveland 

Detroit 


1.09 
1.29 
1.17 
1.85 


26 


Boston 


1.20 


27 
2S 
29 

00 


Providence 

Troy City 

Boston 

Cleveland 

Chicago..., 


1.01 
1.25 
1.43 
1.56 
1.59 


81 


Welch 

f Burns... 

I Powell ...... 

] Corey , 

iRowe, D. E.. 


rroy cuy. ;;;;;; 

Chicago 


1.18 

1.40 


92 


Detroit 


32343 


1 :a so 


1.27 


Worcester 

Cleveland 


255. 

89 j 


(8 

L0 


>,58 
9.48 


63 
22 


1.49 
1.43 



00 



LEAGUE PLAYERS' AVERAGES. 

Batting Averages. — Continued. 



a 

a 


NAME. 


CLUB. 




P3 

ad 

<n 

8 


| 


CD 


CD 

i 


£+* to 


CD 

m 

CD 

O 


3 & 

P a 

$*3 


£ 






o 


h^ 


~ 


< 


« 


PL, 


H 


< 




f Esterbrook.. 


Cleveland 


45 


179 


18 


0.29 


44 


.246 


55 


1.22 




J Trott 

1 Farreli, J. F, 
Denny 


Detroit 


30 
66 
84 


126 

268 
329 


11 
33 
54 


0.36 

0.50 
0.64 


31 

66 
81 


.246 
.246 
.246 


39 
85 
115 


1.30 


33 


(t 


1.28 




Providence 


1.37 




Ward 


$t 


88 


355 


58 0,69 


87 


.245 


105 


1.26 


M 


- Rowan 

i Troy 




82 
42 
78 
26 


322 
163 

278 
104 


35 0.42 
230.54 
89 0.58 
60.24 


79 

40 
67 
25 


.245 

.245 
.241 
.240 


52 
82 
27 


1.17 




Det. and Prov. . . 
Buffalo 


1.23 


35 


Force 

Doscher 


1.12 


36 


Cleveland 


1.08 




j Burdock 

} Had bourne... 


Boston.. 


82 
83 


313 

326 


36,0.44 
30 0.36 


75 
78 


.239 
.239 


95 
92 


1.15 


8" 


Providence 


1.10 


as 


Smith 


Troy and Wor.. 


54 


218 


37 0.6K 


52 


.238 


68 


1.26 




j Hanlon 

| Koseman 


Detroit 


79 
80 


880 
822 


66 0.88 

410.51 


78 
76 


.236 
.236 


121 

110 


1.53 


...» 


Troy City 


1.37 


•lit 


Mann 


Worcester 


19 


77 


12 0.63 


18 


.233 


23 


1.21 


41 


Mountain 


u 


25 


86 


9 0.36 


20 


.232 


32 


1.28 


■ !•' 


Goldsmith. .. 
Creamer 


Chicago 


44 
81 


183 

28-1 


23 

27 


0.52 
0.3,3 


42 
65 


.229 

.228 


57 
96 


1.29 


43 


Worcester 


1.18 


41 


j Keefe 

IWiee 

Matthews 

Gilligan 


Troy City 


51 


186 


24 


0.47 


42 


.225 


67 


1.31 


Boston 


77 
45 
55 


293 
169 
201 


13 
17 

32 


0.55 
0.37 
0.58 


66 
38 
45 


.225 
.224 
.228 


98 
45 
64 


1.27 


4" 


(4 


1.00 


■Mi 


Providence ..... 


1.16 


47 


Pteflar 


Troy City 


88 


821 26 


0.31 


71 


.221 


88 


1.06 


4S 


Irwin 


Worcester 


84 


833 


30 


0.35 


73 


.219 


92 


1.09 


10 


Shaffer 


Cleveland.. 


82 


307 


37 


0.45 


67 


.218 


95 


1.15 


r >0 


Weidman — 
McCormick., 


Detroit 


50 
67 


193 
254 


20 
31 


0.40 

0.50 


42 
55 


.217 

.216 


52 
75 


1.04 


51 


Cleveland 


1.12 


V 


Galvin 

Evans 


Buffalo 


54 

80 


206 

334 


21 
33 


0.39 

0.13 


44 
71 


.213 
.212 


56 

8K 


1.08 


53 


Worcester . 


1.10 


M 


Corcoran 

Kava. ........ 


Chicago 


41 
27 
83 
38 
22 


1U9 
97 

333 
138 
89 


23 0.56 
15 0.55 


35 

20 
68 

28 
18 


.207 
.206 
.204 
.202 
.202 


52 
22 

89 
32 
21 


1.26 


v. 


Providence 

Detroit 


0.81 


v; 


Knight 

(Derby 

1 O'Brien. 


35 

12 

9 


0.42 

0.31 
0.41 


1.07 




tt 


0.84 


K 


Worcester 


0.95 


58 


Quest 

N icol 

McLaughlin . 


Chicago 


42 


159 


23 


(i.5| 


32 


.201 


40 


0.95 


7) 


ti ° 


47 
15 


186 
58 


19 

7 


O.40 
0.46 


37 
11 


.198 
.189 


51 

18 


1.08 


60 


Worcester 


1.20 


61 


Harbidge., , . . 


Troy City 


32 


12811 


0.31 


23 


.187 


27 


0.84 


u\> 


Holbert 


tt 


68 


242 


21 


0.33 


45 


.186 


50 


0.73 


03 


Bradley 


Cleveland 


29 


109 


16 


0.55 


20 


.183 


25 


0.86 


84 


Eagan 


Troy City 


29 


110 


14 


0.4S 


20 


.181 


25 


0.86 


(i:» 


Cass idy 


" . 


29 


121 


14 0.48 


21 


.173 


26 


0.89 


<,<; 


Richmond, J. 


Cleveland 


40 


140 


12 0.30 


24 


.171 


33 


0,82 


67 


j Clinton 

jDailey 

Wright 

Bus hong 


Worcester 


26 


98 


9 0.34 


16 


.163 


18 


0.69 


Buffalo 


29 
45 


110,10|0.34 

IS.'. If 0.31 


18 
30 


.168 
.162 


26 
36 


0.89 


r,s 


Providence 


0.80 


(i!» 


Worcester 


69 


2682010.29 


•10 


.158 


49 


0.71 


To 


Dolan 


Buffalo 


22 


89 


12 0.54 


14 


.157 


19 


0.86 


71 


McGeary — 


Detroit 


88 


127 


14J0.42 


19 


.149 


25 


0.76 


W 


W T hitney, A.. 
Kelly, Jno... 


Prov. and Det .. 


40 


147 


12 0.30 


21 


.142 


21 


0.52 


7:; 


Cleveland 


29 


104 


6 0.20 


14 


.134 


16 


0.55 


74 


Manning 


Providence 


19 


76 


7 it. 37 


8 


.105 


8 


0,42 


75 


Foreter 

Tilley., 


Detroit 


20 
15 


71 
56 


5 0.25 


7 
5 


.098 
.089 


8 


0.35 


7H 


Cleveland 


2 


0.13 


0.53 



• 



LEAGUE PLAYEKS AVERAGES. 



91 



FIELDING AVERAGES 

Of players who have taken part in fifteen or more Championship Games. 
SEASON OF 1882. 



FIRST BASEMEN. 



NAME. 



Brouthers 

Start 

Phillips.. 

Morrill . . . 

Stovey 

1 Anaon 

J Connor... 

Smith 

PoweU 



CLUB. 



Buffalo 

Providence 

Cleveland 

Boston.. 

Worcester 

Chicago 

Troy City.. 

Troy and Worcester. . . 
Detroit 



8 I 

a i 



ii 



974 
.973 
972 

ma 

,956 
.948 
.943 
945 
.940 



SECOND BASEMEN. 



1 


Burdock 

Ferguson 


Boston 


82 
77 
43 
81 
g3 
82 
41 
17 
84 
29 
20 


213 
839 

129 
241 
275 
265 
113 
63 
212 
73 
53 


251 35 


' 499 


920 


2 


Troy City.. 


sae 43 4! is 


913 


3 


Burns 


< 'tiicajTO... . 


127!25 
283 54 
380 63 
289 63 


•>1 
578 
618 
617 
273 

566 

171 
126 


911 


4 


Creamer 


Worcester 

Buffalo 


906 


5 


Richardson 


Rflfi 


6 


Dunlap 


H'17 


7 


) Quest 


Chicago. . 


127 

46 
283 
72 
51 


83 

15 
71 
29 
22 


RTfl 


f Farrell, J. F 


Detroit... 


R79 


<s 


Farrell, Jno 


Providence. . . 


874 


u 


Troy 


Detroit and Providence 
Detroit 


833 


10 


Forster 


.825 



THIRD BASEMEN. 



Ewing 

Williamson.. 
Muldoon 



j Denny. 



. Sutton 

Doscher 

Whitney, A.. 

i Irwin 

! White 

Farrell, J. F. 

Mann 



Troy City 

Chicago 

Clove hind 

Providence , 

Boston 

Cleveland... .... 

Providence and Detroit 

Worcester 

Buffalo 

Detroit 

Worcester 



41 


69 


108 22 


199 


82 


108 


210143 


861 


60 


84 


125 ; 29 


238 


84 


136 


206 55 


397 


76 


98 


144 39 


2^1 


23 


83 


-15 13 


91 


21 


40 


41 14 


95 


51 


84 


14745 


■rx 


63 


59 


ill 33 


203 


41 


47 


65 26 13$ 


18 


24 


28]22i 74 



.880 
.878 
.861 
.861 
.857 
.852 
.837 
.837 
.811 
.702 







92 



LEAGUE PLAYERS AVERAGES. 

Fielding Averages. — Continued, 
SHORT STOPS. 



NAME. 



McGeary.. ,. 

Force 

Glasscock.. 

Rowe, J, C, 

Wright 

Pfeffer 

(Wise.... 

\ Corey.... .... 

Irwin 

Whitney, A. 

Burns 

Kelly, M. J.. 

Manning.... , 



CLUB. 



Detroit 

Buffalo 

Cleveland 

Buffalo 

Providence 

Troy City 

Boston 

Worcester 

Providence and Detroit 
Chicago 

Providence 

FIELDERS. 









d 









o 

u 


aj 


P* 


w 


~ 


^ 


u 


<1 


■'<: 




<a 




a 


c3 


A 

B 
P 


5 

a 


3 


O 


'A 


B 


11 


Q0 


52 


106 


t;i 


66 


209 28 


82 


109 


307 


-11 


22 


7 


70 


11 


45 


46 


188 


28 


81 


160 


270 


72 


71 


84 


197 


41* 


26 


28 


75 18 


83 


41 


123 33 


18 




55 


16 


'11 


60 


131 


40 


41 


66 


117 


43 


IT 


17 


42 


16 



&«} 



5^ 

169 [55 

303 .907 
460 .004 

88 .875 
205 .873 
502 .866 
330 
121 
197 

91 
23 1 



851 
.851 
.832 
.829 
.826 
.809 
.78d 



1 


Horning 

Richmond, Jno..... 
Evans 


Boston 


83 
40 
67 
44 
81 
86 


187 
65 
131 
102 
159 
50 
59 
187 
47 
46 
185 
159 
105 
140 
148 
151 
105 
8 ! 
98 
153 
51 
43 

118 
49 
69 

138 
144 
2* 
88 
10!) 
41 
19 
43 
18 


14 
12 
31 
15 
14 
21 

17 

7 

4 

8 

11 

21 

15 

14 

16 

21 

4 

13 

23 

a 

22 

5 

20 
9 

11 
3 

12 

15 
4 
2 

4 
2 


L5 

7 
16 

14 
21 

9 
11 

26 
7 
7 

27 
24 
Hi 
21 
2(1 
27 
21 

6 
is 
33 
10 

9 
28 

5 
19 
32 
31 

1 
23 
30 
12 

6 
17 
12 


216 

84 

178 

131 

194 

80 

97 

230 

61 

57 

220 

194 

148 

179 

190 

194 

147 

42 

m 

209 
G3 
55 
168 
59 
108 
179 
186 
38 
123 
154 
57 
27 
64 
82 


q*l> 


?. 


Cleveland 


91*> 


:■>, 


Worcester 


qiO 


4 


Esterbrook 


Cleveland 


893 


6 


Wood 


Detroit — 

Chicago. . 


891 


c, 


Kelly, M.J. . 


887 




j Nicol 


Detroit 


36 
79 
46 

■ ■ > 

84 
81 
81 
79 
B3 
82 
80 
15 
56 
M 
24 
23 
84 
29 
49 
72 

80 

..., 

41 
82 
20 
16 
26 
15 


886 


7 


J 11 anion 


886 


fl 


Rowan 


Boston 


885 




j Muldoon 


Cleveland 


877 


9 


j Dalrymple 


Chicago 


877 


10 


Yorke 


Providence 


876 


11 


Knight 


Detroit 


871 


1" 


O'Rourke 


Buffalo 


865 


13 


Hotaling 


Boston.. . 


863 


14 


Hines 


Providence 


rati 




j Roseman 

\ Tilly 


Troy City 


857 


15 


Cleveland 


857 


16 


Hayes 


Worcester, . . 


854 


11 


Gore 


Chicago 


R42 


Ifi 


Connor 


Troy City 


841 


19 


Harbidge 


Buffalo 


836 


;>o 


Foley 


833 


21 


Radoourne 

Ward 


Providence 


RR0 


22 


a 

Troy City 


RM 


v:>, 


Gillespie. . . 


m 


24 


Purcell 


Buffalo..' .. 


820 


v" 


Rowe, D. E ... 

Stovey 


< lleveland 


815 


*:m 


Worcester 


R13 


„ 7 


Shaffer 


Cleveland 


805 


"H 


O'Brien.. 


Worcester 


789 


VI 


Cassidy 


Troy City 


777 


311 


Clinton 

Eagan 


Worcester 


734 


31 


Troy City 


.625 






LEAGUE PLATERS' AVERAGES. 

CATCHERS* AVERAGES. 



93 





NAME. 


CLUB. 


en 
5 

a 
o 


o 

M 

o 

a 


m 

en 

a 


N 
O 
b 
M 

to 

.3 


"3 

<V 

to 


en 
o> 

9 

•a 
O 

2 


-a 

£0 


1 1 


Deaslev 


Boston 


53 
62 
68 
44 

79 
25 

\!l 

m 

53 

m 

52 
17 
26 
20 
29 
15 


357 
430 
887 

440 
103 
108 
:ios 
238 
197 
23S 

70 
112 
114 
113 

57 


54 
06 
82 
41 
91 
45 
37 
101 
118 
45 
88 
26 
31 
39 
35 
16 


18 
30 
27 
15 
37 
20 
25 
47 
45 
32 
35 
6 
22 
22 
37 
15 


41 
41 
41 
38 
64 
12 
21 
56 
51 
35 
68 
27 
28 
36 
52 
33 


470 
567 
437 
340 
632 
180 
251 
512 
45-2 
309 
429 
129 
193 
211 
237 
121 


.874 
.874 
844 


l \ 


Bennett 


Detroit 


2 


Gillian 


Providence 

Buffalo 


Rowe.J c 

Flint 


844 


,v 


Chicago . . . 


840 


4 


Ewing 


Troy City 


822 


8 


Trott 


Detroit ... 


816 


fi 


Bushong 


Worcester 


798 




Holbert 


Troy City 


787 


8 


Rowan 


Boston 


783 


9 


Briody. 


Cleveland . . 


759 





Dolan.. 


Buffalo 


744 


1 


^ava 


Providence . . 


740 


A 2 


White 


Buffalo 


725 


3 


Kelly, Jno 

Hayes ! 


Cleveland 


.624 


4 


Worcester 


.603 



94 



a 

O 

a 

o 

M 



w 

Hi 



LEAGUE PITCHERS' RECORD. 



petfBO no einduoadp 
X*q epuj/C Bas^g jo jaq moji 
■sjuati 
-ocldo jo **a %v eduijx 



•pa^dao 
-oy B33HBq3 jo ©Smudojaj 



-Boonviio I 13 * li 



•saip^d PILW 



■Biojig: Saipiatj 



•Supsissy eoraix 



OOC^l-CSCPOCSC^esL-OCOCCCiCCCOaD 



s|§8|g§ga s iiIiiS8 



COl>C7i-iOGOCOQOO'-(Qt-QOt-CDrTM; 



SOCOSO-*1<Tt<30eO'rH«O^l'C<3T*i-«i-i©>-'CO 






•jno ^ij Jaqraus; 



•eureo jad oSbioav 



•ejasuoddo A*q opttjc 
eini 9S,B a ? BJ P.I 1° Jsqtuuil 



•auiBQ J9d qSbjdav 



eju9tioddo M pQioog sutiy; 



sjuauoddo jo i*g *b seraix 



•poi-etd earauo 



s 



OWt-i-tCOC 



5«lftffl«« 



■** 7-1 6* CO t* rA rl 



w £5 -£ O rA CO I- Tf L- « -4 CI CO 30 OOJi^ 






§illIli§ISllii§iS 



cd tt' cs id so id -** id y* «d ^f t^ *t "* so Tf tP 






r-OWOf i- CI X — ~r o --c X C* JO £- CO 

CTwOnxo*5"r!cjH-at-oiOo 



USS8SSS?q!3S8S;3§S*8 



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*©•;•<» 

§ : : : -b^SiJ d : - - d 

S rt o * «^ o 3 a> y-£ o ^o-r; 

g 3 O B»J 2 o£.2.£ »- « * © *« 



B«9l»B9 



2SS : 3"5'5'BS3|y|||g^ 



r.a 



LEAGUE CLUB AVERAGES. 



2^ 



g@8g g£S£g 

i-i as *-*>*.*■ Cl c* 
awx.ii c« ;.' <- ~> 



t4 



O 



5 



Games Played. 



Games Won. 






cc — ;: ;i -. v> *» : 



Times at Bat. 



Runs Scored. 



*. en *■ *■ ct c* o< -i Average per G am e . 



:r. - 1 c - 1 OC ao -i oo 

X* ii- 'X> Q J-J y< -1 O 



C K *i S ~ r 



First Bases. 



Percentage of Base 
Hits per Times at 
Bat 






M _l M m ti M ii — 



<c ~ ;J x->^ x x 



Total Bases. 



Average per Game. 






QC IP CD «g CO CO <Q CO 



-t (v '/■ i-ri-t *-* *5 00 
-1 ->! « t0 K> tO CD >■* 



Number Put Out. 



Times Assisting. 



Fielding Errors. 



&&a%OQG = 



tit£3£3$ 



"Passed Balls" 
and 
"Wild Pitches. 1 



Total Chances. 



Percentage of 
Chances Accepted. 



8 

P. 



I 

CD 
4 



I 

CD 

GO 

§ 

& 

w 

w 

O 



w 



li) 


o 


2 





bl 


Q 


3 


ft 

O 







a 
p 





4 


tr 1 






CD 


td 


m 


P 

era 

P 




Q 


CD 


M 


i 


O 


© 



96 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 



RECORD OF CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES PLAYED 

DURING THE 

SEASON OF 1882. 



Bate, 



May 1 

1 
1 



Boston vs Worcester 

Providence vs. Troy City . 

Buffalo vs, Chicago "... 

Cleveland vs. Detroit 



Names of Contestanstr. 



Worcester vs. Boston 

Providence vs. Troy City . 



Cleveland vs, Detroit 

Boston vs. Worcester 

Buffalo vs. Chicago 

Wor^ster vs. Providence.. 

Boston vs. Trov City 

Cleveland vs. Chicago 

Buffalo vs. Detroit 

Boston vs. Troy City 

Providence vs.'Worcester.. 

Cleveland vs. Chicago . 

Buffalo vs. Detroit 

Boston vs. Troy City 

Worcester vs. Providence . . 

Buffalo vs. Detroit 

Cleveland vs. Chicago 

Providence vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Cleveland 

Worcester vs. Troy City . , . 



Boston vs. Providence 

Worcester vs. Troy City 

Detroit vs. Buffalo 

Chicago vs. Cleveland 

Providence vs. Boston 

** " Troy City . 

Chicago vs. Buffalo 

Worcester vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. Cleveland 



Chicago vs. Buffalo . . . 
Boston vs. Worcester . 



Providence vs. Troy City . 



Worcester vs. Boston. 
Chicasro vs. Buffalo. . . 
Detroit vs. Cleveland . 



Where 
Plated. 



Boston 

Providence 

Buffalo 

Cleveland . 
« 

Worcester . 
Providence 

14 

Cleveland. . 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Worcester.. 

Boston 

Cleveland., 
Buffalo .... 

Boston 

Providence 
Cleveland.. 

Buffalo 

Boston 

Worcester . 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 
Providence 
Chicago . . . 
Worcester . 



Boston 

Worcester . 
Detroit.... 
Chicago ... 
Providence 
Albany — 
Chicago .. 
Worcester . 
Detroit 

Chicago ... 

Boston 

Albany 

Worcester . 
Chicago . . , 
Detroit 



Winning 
Club. 






Boston 

Providence 

Buffalo 

Detroit 

it 

Worcester . 
Providence 

Detroit 

Boston 

Buffalo .... 
Providence 
Troy City.. 
Chicago ... 
Buffalo .... 

Boston 

Providence 
Cleveland. 
Detroit... 
Troy City. 
Providence 
Detroit ... 
Chicago . . . 
Provide nee 
Chicago .. 
Troy City. 

Boston ... 
Worcester 
Detroit . . . 
Chicago .. 
Providenco 

Chicago .. 
Worcester 
Detroit . . . 
Cleveland 
Buffalo . . . 
Boston . . . 
Troy City. 

Boston ... 

Buffalo . . . 
Detroit . . . 



Runs 
Scored. 



•9*§ 



:. 

7 

11 

Vt 
8 
1 

H 

5 
Vi 
4 

7 
■I 

is 

t 

,r 

■ 9 



5 
3 
5 
4 

1 

10 
1 
1 

4 

2 
1 
« 
3 
3 
1 
5 
1 
13 

4 
8 
4 
4 
4 

1 
1 
1 
4 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 97 

Record of Ciiampionshif Games. — Continued. 





Names of Contestants. 


Where 
Played. 


j 

Win ninu 

Club. 


HlNH 
SCOKED. 


Bate, 
1888. 


.S d 

J 3 

14 

c 

1-J 



12 
5 

4 
3 
1 
5 
5 
8 

20 
9 
7 
9 

4 
6 
6 
9 
3 
4 

11 
9 
5 

10 

10 
5 

13 
6 

13 
6 
8 
6 

10 

10 
4 
6 

15 
1 
7 

10 

6j 


fefl 


May IS 
** 2C 




Detroit 
Cleveland . 

Troy 

Chicago ... 

Worcester . 

Troy 

Cleveland. . 
Chicago ... 

Troy 

Cleveland.. 
Providence 
Detroit .... 
Buffalo .... 
n 

Boston 

Troy 

Detroit .... 
Providence 

Troy 

tt 

Bnff alo 

Boston 

Providence 

Boston 

Albany 

Troy 

Worcester . 

Troy 

Boston 

Providence 
Worcester . 

Boston 

Providence 

Worcester . 
Boston 

Worcester . 
Providence 

Troy 

« 

Providence 
Worcester . 
Boston 

Troy 

it 

Providence 
Worcester.. 


Detroit.... 

Buffalo 

Troy City.. 
Chicago . . . 

Worcester . 

Boston 

Cleveland.. 

Detroit 

Troy City., 
Cleveland., 
Providence 
Detroit .... 
Buffalo .... 
Cleveland. 
Providence 
Troy City.. 
Chicaco . . . 
Providence 
Worcester . 

Buffalo .... 

Boston 

Providence 

Boston 

Chicago ... 
Troy City.. 
Cleveland . 

Troy City.. 

Buffalo 

Detroit 

Cleveland.. 

Boston 

Providence 
Buffalo.... 
Worcester . 

Boston 

Detroit 

Worcester.. 
Providence 
Troy City.. 
Cleveland.. 
Providence 
Chicago . . . 

Boston 

Cleveland. . 
Troy City.. 
Chicago .. . 
Detroit .... 


n 


Cleveland vs. Buffalo 


2 


w 20 




3 


M 3G 




3 


" 22 

'* 22 

" 22 


Worcester vs. Providence 

Trov Citv vs. Boston 


8 

3 


11 23 


Cleveland vs. Buffalo 


3 


" 23 


Chicago vs. Detroit 


g 


" 23 




ii 


" 24 


Cleveland vs. Buffalo 


1 


M 24 

" 25 


Providence vs. Worcester 

Detroit vs. Chicago 


3 



" 25 


Buffalo vs. Cleveland 


1 


" 26 
M 26 


Boston vs. Providence 


B 
4 


" 26 
" 26 


Troy City vs. Worcester 

Detroit vs. Chicago 


B 
3 


" 27 




1 


" 27 
« 29 

" 29 


Troy City vs. Worcester 

Buffalo vs. Cleveland 


4 
4 

8 


" 29 


Boston vs. Providence , 


g 


" 30 


Providence vs. Detroit 





" 30 
" 30 


Boston vs. Buffalo 

Troy City vs. Chicago 


3 
3 


" 30 
" 30 
M 31 
" 31 


Worcester vs. Cleveland 

Trov City vs. Chicago 


4 
2 
6 
8 


w 31 


Boston vs Buffalo 


7 


" 31 


Providence vs. Detroit 


4 


June l 


Worcester vs. Cleveland 

Boston vs. Buffalo 


S 
5 


IC t > 


Providence vs. Detroit 


7 


" 3 


" " Buffalo 


3 


;i 


Worcester vs. Chicago 


3 


5 


Boston vs, Detroit. 


2 


" 6 

cc ( » 

6 

" 6 

7 


Worcester vs, Chicago . 

Providence vs. Buffalo .... 

Proy City vs. Cleveland 

Providence vs. Buffalo 

Worcester vs. Chicago 


2 
8 

7 


o 





Boston vs. Detroit 


■i •: 


H 
9 


Troy City vs. Cleveland 

" " Buffalo 


4 1 
7 8 


9 

9 


Providence vs. Chicago .... 

Worcester vs. Detroit 


14 
T 


4 
4 




gg LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 

Record op Championship Games. — Continued. 





Mames of Contestants. 


Where 
Played. 


Winning 
Club. 


Ht'NS 

Scored. 


Date. 
1382. 




3s 


June 9 
" 10 
" 10 
» 10 
" 10 
« 12 
« 12 
" 12 
" 12 
m 14 
ii 14 

" 14 

u 14 

" 15 
" 15 
M 15 
M 16 
" 16 
t< i r 

" 17 
u l7 

« 19 
it 20 
" 20 

'< 20 
« 20 
« 21 
« 21 
« 21 
" 21 

ii 22 
u 22 
u 22 
" 24 
" 24 
« 24 
« 26 
*' 26 
« 26 


| Boston vs. Cleveland 


Boston 

Worcester . 
Providence 
Trov 

Boston 

Worcester.. 
Providence 

Troy 

Worcester . 
Boston .... 
Providence 

Worcester . 

Boston 

Troy 

Worcester . 

Troy 

Boston 

Providence 
Detroit .... 

Chicago .. 
Cleveland.. 
Buffalo .... 
Chicago . .. 

Detroit 

Cleveland . 
Buffalo .... 
Cleveland. . 
Detroit .... 
Chicago .. . 
Buffalo 

Cleveland. , 
Chicago .. . 

Detroit 

Buffalo 

Cleveland . 

Buffalo 

Chicago . . . 
Detroit.... 

Cleveland..] 
Detroit i 


Boston 

Cleveland.. 

Detroit 

Providence 

Troy City.. 

(( 

Boston 

Detroit 

Chicago . . . 
Troy City.. 
Buffalo .... 
Boston .... 
Providence 
Cleveland.. 
Worcester . 
Boston .... 

Detroit 

Buffalo.... 

Detroit 

Chicago ... 
Providence 
Chicago... 
Providence 
Chicago ... 
Cleveland.. 
Troy City.. 
Chicago ... 
Detroit.... 

Boston 

Buffalo .... 

Boston 

Providence 
Chicago ... 
Buffalo .... 

Boston 

Cleveland.. 
Providence 
Chicago . .. 
Detroit.... 
Buffalo,... 
Cleveland.. 
Troy City . . 

Boston 

Chicago ... 

Detroit.... 

it 

Cleveland. . 
Detroit.... 


4 

6 

10 

17 
15 
10 
7 
18 
18 
11 

2 
4 
8 

U 
ll 

4 
8 
9 
8 

12 

12 

18 
5 
5 

18 
8 
2 

10 
9 

18 
8 

17 





Worcester vs. Detroit 




Providence vs. Chicago 

Troy City vs. Buffalo 


6 
4 


Boston vs. Cleveland 


4 
4 


Worcester vs. Detroit 

Providence vs. Chicago 

Troy City vs. Detroit 

Worcester vs. Buffalo 


5 
9 
4 


Boston vs. Chicago 


g 


Providence vs. Cleveland. 

Worcester vs. Buffalo 


1 
2 


Boston vs. Chicago 


18 


Troy City vs. Detroit 


8 


Worcester vs. Buffalo 


8 


Troy City vs. Detroit 


4 


Boston vs. Chicago 




Providence vs. Cleveland 

Detroit vs. Chicago 


1 



" Providence 

Chicago vs. Worcester 

Cleveland vs. Boston 


8 

?i 
8 


Buffalo vs. Troy City 


1 


Chicago vs. Worcester 


8 


Detroit vs. Providence 


6 


Cleveland vs. Boston 


1 


Buffalo vs. Troy City. . . 


4 


Cleveland vs. Boston 


4 


Detroit vs. Providence 


R 


Chicago vs. Worcester 

Buffalo vs. Troy City 


h 


" Boston 


8 




Cleveland vs. Troy City 

Chicago vs. Providence 

ii ii 

Detroit, vs. Worcester 


7 
9 

8 
6 
8 

13 
8 

Hi 

5 
6 
4 
8 
9 


4 
J> 


7 


Buffalo vs. Boston 


3 


« 26 

« 27 
" 27 


Cleveland vs. Troy City ...... 

Buffalo vs. Boston 


4 

8 


« 27 
" 27 


Chicago vs. Providence 

Detroit vs. Worcester 


1 




« 28 
" 29 
" 29 


U it 

Cleveland vs. Worcester 

Detroit vs. Troy City 


4 
2 
8 


» 29 
« 29 


Buffalo vs. Providence 

Chicago vs. Boston 


Buffalo.... 
Chicago ...1 


Buffalo .... 
Chicago ... 


6 
2 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES 99 

Record of Championship Games. — Continued. 



Date, 

1882. 



June 
July 



NAMES OF CONTESTANTS. 



Chicago vs. Boston 

Cleveland vs. Worcester. 



Chicago vs. Boston .... 
Buffalo vs. Providence. 
Detroit vs. Troy City .. 



Whebx 

Played. 



Buffalo vs. Providence. 

" Worcester.. 



Chicago . . 

Cleveland. 
u 

Chicago .. 
Buffalo . . . 
Detroit 

■ Buffalo ... 



Chicago vs. Trov City [Chicago . . 

Detroit vs. Boston , Detroit . . . 

I 

Cleveland vs. Providence Cleveland. 



Buffalo vs. Worcester ..... (Buffalo 

Detroit vs. Boston : Detroit 

Chicago vs. Trov City Chi 

" Detroit j " 

Cleveland vh. Buffalo Cleveland.. 

Worcester vs. Boston -Worcester 



Winning 
□ Club. 



Chicago ... 

Cleveland.. 

Chicago . .. 
Providence 
fscy < -v. 

Detroit 

Buffalo .... 



Chicago . . . 
ft 

Detroit 

Boston 

Providence 

Cleveland. . 

u 

Buffalo 

Boston 

Chicago . .. 



Cleveland.. 
Boston 



Rl Si 

ScOKED. 



to [ 



°r^.ar- 



200 LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 

Record of Championship Games. — Continued. 



M 



Date, 

1882. 



July 



Aug. 



Names or Contestants. 



Troy City vs. Providence. . . 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

Boston vs. Worcester 

Cleveland vs, Buffalo 

Troy City vs. Providence. . . 

Worcester vs. Boston 

Chicago vs. Detroit 

" vs. Buffalo 

Providence vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. Cleveland 

ft a 

Troy City vs. Worcester 

Detroit vs. Cleveland 

Troy City vs. Worcester 

Boston vs. Providence 

Chicago vs. Buffalo 

u a 

Providence vs. Boston 

Boston vs. Providence 

Troy City vs. Worcester.. . 

Chicago vs. Cleveland 

Detroit vs. Buffalo. 

Providence vs. Worcester.. 
Chicago vs. Cleveland 

Troy City vs. Boston 

Providence vs. Worcester. . 
Detroit vs. Buffalo 

tt it 

Chicago vs. Cleveland 

Worcester vs. Providence . . 
Trov City vs. Boston 

u tt 

Providence vs. Worcester.. 

Detroit vs. Chicago 

it a 

Providence vs. Troy Citv.. 

Buffalo vs. Cleveland 

Worcester vs. Boston 

Boston vs. Worcester 

Providence vs. Troy City.. 

Buffalo vs. Cleveland 

Detroit vs. Chicago 

Boston vs. Worcester 

Providence vs. Troy City. , . 

Buffalo vs. Cleveland 

Boston vs. Chicago 



Where 
Played, 



Troy City.. 

Chicago 

Boston 

Cleveland.. 

Troy 

Worcester . 
Chicago , . , 

Providence. 
Detroit 

Troy , 

Detroit 

Troy 

Boston 

Chicago ,. . 
u 

P rovidence 

Boston 

Troy 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Providence 
Chicago 

Troy 

Providence. 

Detroit. .... 

it 

Chicago 

Worcester. . 
Troy 

Providence. 

Detroit .... 

t< 

Providence. 

Buffalo 

Worcester.. 
Boston..... 
Providence 
Buffalo .... 
Detroit 

Boston 

Providence 
Buffalo .... 
Boston 



Providence 



Detroit 

Worcester . 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 
" rovidence. 
Worcester. . 
Chicago ... 

Buffalo 

Boston 

Cleveland.. 



Winnino 
Club. 



Troy City.. 
Detroit. .. 
Troy City.. 
Boston 

Chicago.., . 

Buffalo 

Providence 

Boston 

Troy City.. 

Chicago 

Detroit.... 

Buffalo 

Providence 
Chicago 

Troy City.. 
Providence. 
Detroit 



Cleveland . . 
Providence. 
Troy City.. 
Boston..*... 
Providence. 
Chicago .. . 

Detroit 

Providence. 

Buffalo 

Worcester . 

Boston 

Troy City.. 
Cleveland.. 
Chicago ... 

Boston 

Providence 
Buffalo.... 
Boston 



Runs 

Scored. 



p F 



10 
4 

10 



8 
6 
6 
:■', 

10 
6 

36 
10 
10 
15 

3 

10 
11 
5 
6 
6 



4 
G 

11 
1 
6 

i 

4 
4 
5 
3 






LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 101 

Hecokd of Championship Games.— Continued^ 



Date, \ 



Names of Contestants. 



Providence vs. Cleveland 

Troy City vs. Buffalo 

Worcester vs. Detroit. 

Providence vs. Cleveland ...... 

« Cleveland,. 

Boston vs. Chicago.. 

Worcester vs, Detroit 



Boston vs. Chicago 

Trov City vs. Buffalo. . . . 
*« Detroit.... 

Boston vs. Cleveland 

Providence vs. Chicago. 
Worcester vs. Buffalo . . 



Trov Citv vs. Detroit... 
Boston vr. Cleveland.... 
Providence vs. Chicago.. 



Worcester vs. Buffalo — 
Boston vs. Cleveland..., 

Troy City vs. Detroit 

Providence vs. ** 

Trov City vs. Chicago..., 
it « 

Providence vs. Detroit. . . 

Boston vs. Buffalo 

Worcester vs. Cleveland. 
« « 

Boston vs. Buffalo 



Providence vs. Detroit . . . 
Worcester vs. Cleveland. 
Troy City vs. Chicago . . . 

Boston vs. Detroit 

Worcester vs. Chicago 



Boston vs. Detroit 

Troy City vs. Cleveland. 

Boston vs. Detroit 

Worcester vs. Chicago.. 
Providence vs. Buffalo.. 



Troy City vs. Cleveland. 



Providence vs. Buffalo — 

Detroit vs. Troy City 

Chicago vs. Boston 

Cleveland vs. Worcester. 



Providence. 
Troy 



Worcester.. 
Providence. 



Boston — 
Worcester. , 



Boston. 
Troy 



Boston 

Providence 
Worcester . 



Where 
Played. 



Tioy 

Boston 

Providence. 

Worcester . 

Boston 

Troy 

Providence 
Troy <v .... 

Providence. 

Boston 

Worcester. . 
« 

Boston 

Providence 
Worcester . 
Troy City.. 

Boston 

Worcester . 

Boston 

Troy 

Boston — 

Worcester . 

Providence. 

u 

Troy 

<< 

Providence. 

Detroit 

Chicago ... 
Cleveland.. 



Winning 
Club. 



1° 



Providence, 
Buffalo.... 
Troy City. 
Detroit.... 

■ ••,.'.-;■.•- ' 

Cleveland. 
Chicago.. . 
Worcester 
Detroit ... 
Boston — 
Troy City. 

Boston ... 

Chicago .. 

Buffalo . . . 

it 

Troy City. 
Cleveland. 
Providence. 



Buffalo. 
Boston 
Detroit. 
Providence 
Troy City, 
Chicago .. 
Providence 
Buffalo. . . . 
Cleveland, 
ti 

Boston 

Buffalo ... 

Providence. 

Cleveland. 

Chicago*.. 

Boston. . . . 

Chicago... 

Worcester 

Boston ... 

Cleveland 

Boston ... 

Chicago. . . 

Buffalo ... 

Providence 

Cleveland 



Buffalo, . . . 
Detroit. . . . 
Boston. . . . 
Cleveland 



Runs 

S COKED. 



I- 



3 
3 
7 
2 

1 
2 

5 
5 
2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
9 
4 

8 

4 


4 
1 
4 

1 

*? 

8 
1 
8 
7 
3 
2 
1 
5 
2 
2 

3 

4 
3 

4 
3 
1 
4 



102 LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 

Record of Championship Games. — Continued, 



il I 



Date, 
1882. 



Aug. 
Sept. 



Names of Contestants. 



Cleveland vs. Worcester. 
Buffalo vs. Providence 



Winning 
Club. 



Where 
Played. 



Cleveland 
Buffalo.... 



Chicago vs. Boston Chicago. , . 

Detroit vs. Troy City j Detroit 

Buffalo vs. Providence I Buffalo . . . 

Chicago vs. Boston "Chicago... 



Detroit vs. Troy City.. . 

Cleveland vs. Worcester. 

Cleveland vs. Providence 

Buffalo vs. Worcester 

5 Chicago vs. Troy City . . . 
B.Detroit vs. Boston 



71 Chicago vs. Troy City 

7j Buffalo vs. Worcester 

7 Cleveland vs. Providence. , 



9i Detroit vs. Boston 

" Chicago vs. Troy City. . 

Buffalo vs. Worcester... 
" Troy City... 

Chicago vs. Providence. 

Cleveland vs. Boston — 

Detroit vs. Worcester. . . 



Chicago vs. Providence. 

Cleveland vs. Boston 

Buffalo vs. Trov City ... . 



Chicago, vs. Providence. . 
Detroit vs. Worcester. . . . 

Cleveland vs. Boston 

" Troy City. 
Chicago vs. Worcester... 
Detroit vs. Providence . , 
Buffalo vs. Boston. 



Cleveland vs. Troy City . . . 

Buffalo vs. Boston 

Detroit vs. Providence — 
Chicago vs. Worcester 

Detroit vs. Providence 

Cleveland vs. Chicago , 

Buffalo vs. Detroit 

Boston vs. Troy City. 

Providence vs. Worcester. 
Cleveland vs. Chicago 



Chicago ... 

Buffalo 

Cleveland.. 

Detroit.... 

Chicago — 

Buffalo .... 

u 

Chicago ... 
Cleveland . 
Detroit 



23 Buffalo vs. Detroit. 



Detroit. 
Cleveland . 



Buffalo... 
Chicago . 
Detroit. . . 



Chicago ... 
Cleveland.. 
Buffalo.... 

u 

Chicago 

Detroit.... 
Cleveland.. 

Chicago 

Detroit .... 
Buffalo .... 

Cleveland., 
Buffalo .... 

Detroit 

Chicago.... 

Detroit 

Cleveland.. 

Buffalo 

Boston 

Providence 
Cleveland.. 
Buffalo 



Cleveland . 
Providence 

Buffalo 

Chicago .. . 

Detroit 

Providence. 

Boston 

Detroit 

Worcester.. 
Providence, 
Buffalo .... 

Chicago 

Detroit 

Boston 

Chicago.. .. 
Buffalo.... 

Providence 
t< 

Detroit 

Chicago 

Buffalo .... 

Chicago.... 
Boston 

Worcester. . 
Detroit .... 
Chicago*... 
Cleveland . 
Buffalo .... 

M 

Chicago.... 

Worcester . 

Cleveland . 

« 

Chicago — 
Detroit .... 

Buffalo 

Boston 

Cleveland . 

Boston 

Providence 
Chicago.... 

Providence. 
Cleveland . 

Buffalo 

Troy City.. 
Providence 
Chicago,... 
Buffalo .... 



Runs 

Scored- 



E I 

BE ** 

••o 



m »4 



4 
2 
2 
1 


3 
3 
2 


3 
1 
1 




1 

2 
4 

4 
6 
5 

a 

5 
*2 
2 
6 
2 
2 

4 

1 
1 

1 



LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES- 

Recokd of Championship Games— Continued. 



103 



Bate. 


1882. 


Sept 


. 35 




25 


u 


35 


1( 


-:. 


I. 


25 


u 


96 


14 


86 


<< 


27 


(1 


27 


(4 


2S 


(I 


28 


[1 


28- 


ft 


89 


CI 


29 


(( 


80 


CI 


80 


Oct. 


ll 



Names op Contestants, 



Buffalo vb. Detroit. 

Boston vs. Troy City 

Worcester vs. Providence . 



Cleveland vs. Chicago... 
Boston vs. Troy City . . . . 
Buffalo vs. Chicago. . 
Worcester vs. Troy City. 
Chicago vs. Buffalo 



Winning 
Clubs. 



Buffalo . . . 

Boston 

Worcester 

Cleveland. 

Boston 

Buffalo ... 
Worcester. 



Worcester vs. Troy City Mm 

Cleveland vs. Detroit Cleveland.. 

^IZl^Tr'oyCity | Worcester . 

Chicago vs. Buffalo 'Chicago.... 

Boston vs. Providence Boston 

Providence vs. Boston IProvulence. 



Where 
Played. 



a a 

1° 



Buffalo 

Boston — 
Worcester . 
Providence 
Chicago — 
Troy City.. 
Chicago — 
Troy City.. 
Chicago — 

Troy City.. 
Detroit .... 
Cleveland.. 
Troy City . . 
Chicago — 
Providence 
Boston 



Total. 



Runs 

Scored. 



2559 104 



1 





8 


7 


11 


8 


6 


1 


u 


5 


4 


1 


4 


o 


9 





11) 


7 


6 


5 



Total Number of Runs Scored, 3,606. 
RUNS SCORED BY CLUBS. 

r , 1 .„„ rt 003 Opponents, 

Chicago 4r o i. 

Providence r ™ « 

Buffalo.. %g 

Boston o <K) « 

Cleveland :^ 7 « 

Detroit. . ., 'T{k 

Troy City Jig 

Worcester . . 



3606 



353 
356 
462 
407 
3 ( ^ 
47i) 
508 
652 

3606 



Average numher of runs scored ^^^^y^j^g^:\ 



Average numiwr 01 iuiibbwi™ i«" *•* v . i««»lw» r-Vriha 

Average number of runs scored per game by losing cluos. 



.7.oii 
.3.13 



SCHEDULE OF LEAGUE GAMES FOB 1883. 



1383. 


6 

3.1 

U 


*/8 




U 


d 

<;fea 
pq 


+» 
pq 




u 
C 

<? 




O 








May 1 


June 


»3 


June 20 


June 14 


June 8 


June 2*M;iv3<» 






" 2 


M 


*S 


" 21 


M iS 


" 9 


" 4|t " 3o 






" 3 


" 


26 


" 22 


" 16 




M s | U 3, 


CMoago, 




June 27 


Aug. 


•7 


Aug. 1 1 


" 18 


" 12 


" 6 


June 1 






Aug. 7 


" 


iS 


" '3 


Sept. 11 


Sept 15 


Sept. 21 


Sept. 27 






8 


" 


ao 


« M 


" 12 


l< 18 


" 22 






" g 


*' 


ji 


" is 


« 13 

June 8 


" 19 


" 2S 


" 2 9 




May g 




Juno 


.•(, 


June 23 


June i4;*Mav ^o 


June 2 




!! 1 




" 


21 


« 25 


<• 9 


« iSt" 30 


" 4 






11 


22 


" 26 


l < 11 


" 16 


" 31 


5 


Detroit. 


Sept- 4 




Aug. 


11 


Aug. 17 


t( ia 


" iS 


June 1 


" 6 




" 5 






13 


" iS 


Sept. 15 Sept. 11 


bfpt. 27 
" 2S 


Sept. 21 




11 6 




. " 


14 


" 20 


•* iS 


12 


** 32 




8 




M 


•5 


*' 2t 


« 19 


u I3 


M 29 


** 24 




*July 4 


June 28 






May 5 


*May 3 o 


f May 30 June 14 


June 8 




t " 4 


" 29 






« l 


June 4 


" 3i 


x 5 


9 




6 


" 30 






5 


June 1 


«• 16 


«i u 


Cleveland, 


14 7 


July 2 






Sept. 4 


k « 


" 2 


*« iS 


44 12 




Aug 1 , 29 


Aug. 23 






" 5 


Sept. 27 


Sept. 21 
'* 22 


Sept. IK 
44 18 


Sept. 11 




M 3° 


" 24 






" 6 


« 2-S 


•« 12 




Sept. 1 


« 25 






» 8 


•« 29 


<« 25 


*' 19 


« i| 




June 28 


*July 4 


May 


j 




fMay^o 


♦May 30 


June 8 


June 14 




" 29 


t" 4 


" 


t 




« 31 


June 4 


9 


" l S 




" 30 


a 6 


u 


\ 




June 1 


" S 


M 11 


M 16 


Buffalo. 


July 2 


7 


June 


*7 




" 2 


tt 6 


" 12 


4( 18 




Aug. 23 
" 24 


Aug. 29 
" 30 


Aug. 


I 




Sept. 21 
M zz 


Sept. 27 

" 23 


Sept. 11 
" 12 


Sept. 15 




« 25 


Sept. 1 


" 


<; 




u 3S 


" 29 


" 13 


" 19 




May 19 


May 24 


May 


*S 


May 10 




June 29 ! Muy 1 


May 4 




" 21 


" 25 




16 


*« n 




July 3I " a 


* s 




" 22 


" 26 


<l 


'7 


" 12 




Aug. 7j l< 3 


J\ 7 


Boston, 


J ^ ^ 


July 10 


July 


.V 


July 24 




'* g,*July 4 


tJuly 4 




ii t , 


Aug. 


1 


u 25 




" 25 Aug. 30 


« 6 




11 19 


" 12 




2 


« 26 




Sept. 6 


" 3i 


" 7 




" 21 


M 14 


" 


4 


» 2S 




S 


Sept. 4 


bept 1 




May 24 


May 19 


May 


10 


May 15 


June 30 




May 4 


May 1 




M 2 5 


" 31 


** 


1 1 


«■ 16 


July 2 




' S 


M 2 




" 26 


M 22 


" 


: j 


w 1? 


Aug. 8 




11 7 


(< 3 


Frovid'oe. 


Jll 1 }' 10 


July 17 


July 


34 


July 3 1 


" 11 




tJuiy 4 


♦July 4 
Aug. 30 




*' 11 


11 18 


" 


- 


Aug. 1 


" 2 t 
" 28 




u 6 




'* 12 


" 19 


" 


Jn 


" 2 




Ii 7 


" 3* 




" *4 


" 21 


" 


38 


" 4 


Sept 7 




Sept. 1 


Sept. 3 




May 15 


May 10 


May 


H 


May 19 


June 21 


June 19 




|une jo 




" 16 


" 11 




^ 


** 21 


u 22 


" 20 




July a 




« 17 


" 12 


" 


10 


» 22 


■• 26 


« 23 




Aug. 7 


New Tori:, 


July 31 


July 24 


July 


I? 


July 10 


Aug. iS 


" 25 




« 9 




Aug. 1 


" 2 S 




" 11 


Aug. 14 




« 25 




« 2 


" 20 


" 


tg 


«* 12 


•■ 21 


M ,5 




Sept. 6 




" 4 


" sS 


11 


21 


" H 


<* 22 


" 10 




" 8 




May 10 


May 15 


May 


19 


May 24 


June 19 


June 2i 


June 39 






" ii 


" 16 


« 


21 


« 25 


kt 20 


" 21 


July 3 






" 12 


« 1? 


11 


J I 


" 2D 


" 23 


" 26 


Aug. 8 




Phil'a. 


July 24 


July 31 


July 


to 


July 17 


« 25 


(i 27 
Aug. 18 


« n 






« 2 | 


Aug. 1 


M 


11 


Aug. 14 


M 24 

" 28 






•■ 26 


** 2 




U 


" 19 


« i? 


•« 31 






" 2S 


" 4 


f| 


M 


" 21 


M 2J 


Sept. s 



*A.M. tP. M 



Schedule of Games of American Association for 1883. 




• A. M. tP. M. 



SCHEDULE OF GAMES OF NORTHWESTERN 
LEAGUE FOR 1883. 





>, 


■ > 


d 


3 




rt 


*T3 

"3 


P-\ 


CLUBS. 


<i 




N 






<1 




jj w 

H 




(3 




H 




£ 


Ph 


a 


a 






May 3 


May S 


Mav 10 


July j 4 


July 25 


July 9 


July 19 






« 25 


Aug. 6 


tl H 


" 16 


" 26 


•* 10 


* 4 21 


Bay City. 




" 26 
u 3I 


*' 12 

Aug-, 1 


" 17 
Sept. 22 


44 28 
Sept. 18 


,k 12 
Se])t. 26 


« 23 

Sept. 14 






July 4 


;.' 7 


" 2 


" 24 


' U) 


" 27 


kt 15 






" 4 


* 9 


" 4 


" 25 


*' 20 


11 2 p 


M I7 




May i 




M.iy in 


wa ) r S 


July 25 


July 14 


July 19 


Julv I) 




M 2 




44 11 


« m 


" 26 


M 16 


" 21 


" IO 


Caginaw. 


" 2 4 

" 3° 




M 12 

Aug. 1 


Aug. 6 


" 2S 

Sept. 26 


a U 17 

Sept. 22 


l< 23 
Sept. 1 4 


" 12 

Sept. 18 




" 30 




2 


7 


1 2/ 


fl 24 


" 15 


'* 10 




July J 
May 17 




" 4 


" 9 


" 29 


M 2 S 


« .7 


*' 20 




May 15 




May 1 


July 9 


July 19 


July 25 


July 14 




» 19 


" 16 




" 3 


M 10 


»• 21 


fc * 20 


M 16 


Toledo. 


44 21 
Aug-. 16 


44 22 
Aug. 13 




" 3 
« 30 


" 12 

Sept 14 


« 23 

Sept. 26 


M 2S 

Sept. 18 

14 T 9 


Sept. 22 




44 jS 


" »4 




it ^ 


" 15 


« 27 


*« 24 




'* 20 


" 21 




U jj 


" 17 


" 29 


« 20 


M 2S 




May 15 


M.iy 17 


May 24 




July 19 


July 9 


July 14 


July 25 




» 16 


M 19 


" 25 




4i 21 


'* 10 


" 16 


41 2'1 


Grand 


<( 22 


" 21 


'* 26 




" n 


" 12 


M i; 


44 28 


Bapida. 


Aug-. 13 


Aug. 16 


Julv 2 




Seot. iS 


Sept. 14 


Sept. 22 


Sept. 20 




" 14 


44 18 


« 4 




" 19 


» 1S 


" 24 


A 2? 




a 2] 


" 20 


M 4 




" 20 


" 17 


" 25 


44 29 




June 16 


June 14 


June 9 


June 4 




May 24 


May n; 


May 19 




44 iS 


M 15 


" n 


** S 




« 25 


•« i& 


'• 21 


Ft. Wayne. 


" 20 
Sept. 6 


'* 21 

Sept. 3 


'*■ 12 
Aug. 19 


1" 7 

Aug-. 24 




" 26 
Aug. 1 


" 17 

Aug. 


44 22 
July 2 




S 


4 


" 30 


" 25 




« 2 


" 7 


"' 4 




" 10 


44 11 


Sept. 1 


«• 27 




" 4 


« 9 


" 4 




June 7 


June .} 


June 14 


June iS 


May 10 




May 19 


May 1 




«• 9 


\\ 5 


" 15 


M 20 


a „ 




M 21 


U 2 


Peoria, 


M 11 

Aug. 7 


M 12 

Aug. 24 


M 16 

Sept. 3 


44 21 

Sept. S 


" 12 

Aug. 13 




" 22 


Aug. is 




" 29 


u 25 


4 


" 10 


" H 




*' 30 


i. 2a 




" 30 


Sept. 1 


u 6 


M n 


" »S 




( , aj 


44 21 




June 4 


June 7 


June iS 


June If 


May 1 


May e; 




Mav 21 




41 5 


" 9 


•" 20 


u 15 


44 2 


July 2 




"" 25 


Springfield. 


" 12 
Sept. 3 


14 u 

Sept. 6 


M 21 

Aug. 24 


44 16 

Aug. 29 


Aug. iS 




• 4 26 
Aug. 13 




4 


»' 8 


«< as 


" 3P 


« 19 


" -1 




** M 




" 11 


" 10 


" -7 


Sept. 1 


14 21 


" 4 




14 15 




June 14 


June 16 


June 4 


June 9 


May t; 


May ^ 


May 10 






M T 5 


« iS 


" 5 


" 11 


« 30 


*! ! 5 


" 11 




Quincy. 


M 21 

Aug. 24 


« 20 

Aug. j 7 


0" 7 
Sept. 8 


" 12 
Sept. 3 


" 16 

Aug. 6 


*« 12 

Aug. 2 






M 2$ 


* 4 29 


M 10 


4 


44 3° 


:* 7 


" 2 






Sept. 1 


M 30 


« 11 


" 6 


" 3' 


*- 9 


" 4 





ADDED. 

At Saginaw, Bay City plays Saginaw, May 30, P. M. O.ull'. 
At Bay City, Bay City plays Saginaw, May 30, A. M. (Jain-,. 
At Saginaw, Bay City plays Saginaw, July 4, A. M. Game. 
At Bay City, Bay City plays Saginaw, July 4, P. M. Game. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 



AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE NATIONAL LEAGUE, 
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION, AND NORTH- 
WESTERN LEAGUE. 

The National League of Professional Base Ball Clubs, the 
American Association of Base Bali Clubs, and the North- 
western League of Base Ball Clubs, in consideration of the 
mutual advantages to be derived therefrom, agree each with 
the other, as follows : 

First: The players named in the lists hereto attached shall 
be deemed to be players in good standing, in their respective 
clubs, as named in said rists, until November i, unless sooner 
expelled or released, as hereinafter provided, and no Club mem- 
ber of either of the parties hereto shall contract with, or em- 
ploy, either of said players for any period prior to said Novem- 
ber i, 1S83, unless said player be duly released, and notice 
thereof given, as hereinafter provided. 

Second: Any player not named on the lists hereto attached, 
or who was not, prior to January 1, 1SS3, expelled or suspended 
for the season of 1833, by either of the parties to this agreement, 
who shall* be employee! for the season of 1883, or any part 
thereof, by any Club member of either of the parties hereto, 
shall be deemed and held to be a player in good standing of 
such club, for any term of service terminating by November 
1, 1SS3, that may be stipulated in his contract of employment, 
provided that written notice of such contract, in accordance 
with the rules of the Association to which the contracting Club 
belongs, shall be filed with the Secretary of such Association, 
and communicated by him in writing to the Secretaries of the 
other two Associations, by whom such. notice shall in turn be 
served upon the Clubs composing such other two Associations, 
and, on receipt of such notice, every Club member of all the 
parties hereto, excepting the contracting Club, shall be debarred 
from employing or playing the said player at any time prior to 
the expiration of the said term of service, excepting as herein- 
after provided. 

Third: When a player is expelled or suspended in accord- 
ance with its rules, by either of the parties hereto, notice of 
such expulsion or suspension shall be served upon the Secreta- 
ries of the other two Associations by the Secretary of the Asso- 
ciation from whose Club such player shall have been expelled 
or suspended; and the Secretaries of such other two Associa- 
tions shall forthwith serve notice of such expulsion or suspen- 
sion upon the Club members of such other two Associations, 
and, from the receipt of such notice, all Club members of all 
the parties hereto, shall be debarred from employing or playing 
with, or against, such expelled or suspended player, until the 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



period of suspension shall have terminated, or the expulsion 
be revoked by the Association from which such player was 
expelled, and due notice of such revocation served upon the 
Secretaries of the other two Associations, and by them upon 
their respective Clubs. 

Fourth : No contract shall be made for the services of any 
pla^v er by any Club member of either of the parties hereto for 
a longer period than seven months, beginning April ist, and 
terminating October 31st, in each year, and no such contract for 
services to be rendered after the expiration of the present year 
shall be made prior to the 10th day of October of each year, 
nor shall any negotiation be entered into by or between" any 
Club or agent thereof, with any player for services to be rendered 
in an ensuing year, prior to the said 10th day of October 

Fifth: On the 20th day of September of each year, eaclv 
Club member of the parties hereto shall transinit to the Secre- 
tary of its Association a list of names of any players, not ex- ■ 
ceeding eleven in number, on that date under contract with 
such Club, which such club desires to reserve for the ensuing 
year, accompanied by a statement over the signature of the Sec- 
retary of such Club, that such Club is willing to pay not less 
than one thousand dollars as the compensation of each player 
so reserved, in the contract to be made with him for the ensuing 
season, provided such Club be a member of the National* 
League, or American Association; and, if a member of the 
North Western League or of any Alliance Club of any party 
hereto, seven hundred and fifty dollars. And the Secretary 
of each Association shall, on the 25th day of September, 
transmit to the Secretaries of the other two Associations, parties 
hereto, a full list of players thus reserved. The Secretary ol 
each Association shall, 'thereupon, on the 5th day of October, 
transmit to each Club member of such Association a full list of 
all players so reserved by all Clubs then composing the three 
Associations, and no Club member of either of the parties 
hereto, shall have the right to contract, negotiate with, or em- 
ploy any player so reserved by any other Club member of either 
of the parties hereto, unless the Club member reserving the 
player shall have notified the Secretary of the Association to 
which such Club member belongs of the release of such player 
from such reservation ; and, in case of such release, the Secre- 
tary of such Association shall notify the Secretaries of the 
other two Associations, parties hereto; and the Secretaries of 
the three Associations shall notify all the Club members, par- 
ties hereto, of such release ; and, on receipt of such notice, any 
Club member of the parties hereto will have the right to em- 
ploy the player so released from reservation, provided that 
twenty days shall have elapsed between the release from such 



spalding's official 

reservation before such player shall be eligible to contract with 
another Club. , 

Sixth • Any contract between a Club member of any of the 
parties hereto and a player, made in accordance with the provi- 
sions of this agreement, shall be deemed valid and binding, and 
•ill other Clubs shall be debarred from employing such player 
during- the period of such contract; provided that such contract 
shall be considered to take effect upon receipt of written notice 
thereof by the Club members of the parties hereto, and the 
transmission of such notice by the respective Secretaries of the 
parties hereto is hereby made mandator)' upon said Secretaries ; 
and such notice must follow immediately upon receipt of the 
contracting Club's notice to the Secretary of the Association to 
which such contracting Club belongs. 

Seventh : ' Anv disputes or complaints arising out of the 
performance of the stipulations of this agreement, and any 
alleged violations of this agreement; also, any question of in- 
terpretation of any stipulations of this agreement, shall be 
referred to an Arbitration Committee, to consist of three 
representatives of each party hereto, to be appointed prior to 
the *ist davof March, 18S3, by the parties hereto; notice of 
such appointment to be served upon the Secretaries of each 
Association ; and the decision of such ArDitration Committee 
upon such matters or any of them, shall be final and binding 
upon the parties hereto. , . 

In witness whereof, the said parties have, by the President of 
each of the parties hereto, thereunto duly authorized, signed this 
agreement on the dates set opposite their respective signatures. 

The National League of Professional Base Ball Cluds. 
March 5, 1SS3, by A. G. MILLS, President. 

The American Association of Base Ball Clubs. 
March 13, 1SS3, by H. D. McKNIGHT, President. 



The North-western League of Professional Base 
Ball Clubs, 
February 17, 1SS3, by ELIAS MATTER, President. 






BASE BALL GUIDE. 

Zdst of Players Referred to in the First Section of the 
Annexed Agreement. 

NATIONAL LEAGUE. 



Burdock, J. J. 
Sutton, E. B. 
Morrill, J. F. 
Hackett, M. M. 

Foley, Chas. J. 
Rowe, J. C. 
Shaffer, Geo. 
Derby, Geo. H. 



Whitney, J. E. 
Buffington, C. G. 
Radford, P. R. 
Brown, L. J. 

BUFFALO. 

Richardson, H. 
Force, D. W. 
O'Rourke, Jas. 
Kennedy, M. J. 



Wise, S. W. 

Hornung, Jos. 
Mines, Michael. 



Galvin, J. F. 
Brouthers, D. 
White, J. L. 



Anson, A. C. 
Kelly, M. J. 
Goldsmith, F. E. 
Pfeffer, Fred. 

Hotaling, P. J. 
Glasscock, Jno. W. 
McCormick, James 
Bancroft, F. C. 
Dailey, Hugh 

Houck, S. P. 
Bennett, C. W. 
Hanlon, Edward, 
Powell, M. J. 

Clapp, Jno. E. 
Hankinson, F. 
Troy, Jno. 
Welsh, M. 



Gross, E. M. 
Lewis, Fred. 
Manning, Jno. 
Gaunt, Chas.W., Jr. 

Nava, V. 
Denny, Jer. 



Williamson, E. N. 
Corcoran, L. 
Burns, Thos. E. 
Stockwell, L. C. 

CLEVELAND. 

Phillips, W. B. 
Briody, Chas. 
Dun lap, Fred, 
York, Thos. 

DETROIT. 

Trott, S. W. 
Farrell, Jos. F. 
Burns, Rich'd S 
Quest, J. L. 

NEW YORK. 

D organ, M. C. 
Caskins, E. J. 
Gillespie, P. 
Connor, R. 

PHILADELPHIA. 

Neagle, Jno. 
McClellan, W. H. 
Ringo, F. C. 
Roberts, C. J. 

PROVIDENCE. 

Gilligan, R. 
Farrell, Jno. 



Gore, Geo. F. 
Dalrymple, A. 
Flint, F. S. 



Evans, Jacob 
Muldoon, M. 
Bradley, Geo. W. 
Bushong, A. J. 



Wood, Geo, A. 
Weidman, Geo. K. 
Man sell, Thos. 



O'Neill, Jas. E. 
Ward, Jno. M. 
Ewing, Wm. 



Henderson, H. 
Purcell, W. A. 
Coleman, Jno. T. 



Irwin, A. A. 
Start, Jos. 



spaldinxj's official 



Carroll, Cliff 
Cassidy, P. P. 



Radbourn, Chas. 
Richmond, J. L. 
Smith, E. E. ' 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. 



Hines, P. A. 
Robinson, Chas. II 



Swartwood, C. E . 
Hayes, J. J. 
Creamer, George 
Battin, J. V. 

Rowen, E. 
Knight, A. 

O'Brien, John 
Blakiston, R. 

McConnick, J. 
Say, L. 
Fox, J- J. 
Baker, Phil. 

Carpenter, W. W. 
White, W. H. 
Maculler, J. F. 
Wheeler, H. 
Fulmer, Chas. 

Straub, J. 
Schwartz, W. A. 
Smith, C. M. 
Valentine, J. G. 

Sullivan, D. C. 
Browning, L. 
Leary, J. 
Gerhardt, J. J. 

Keefe, T\ J. 
Reipsch lager, C. 
Kennedy, Edward 
Crane, S. N. 

Mullane, Tony 
Comiikey, C. A. 



ALLEGHENY. 

Taylor, W. H. 
D rise oil, John 
Nolan, E. S. 
Overbeck, II. A. 

ATHLETICS. 

Strieker, J. 
Corey, F. II. 
Mathews, R. 
Crowley, W. 

BALTIMORE. 

Larkin, F. 

Kelley, J. F. 
Egglet, D. 

CINCINNATI. 

Snyder, C. N. 
Soramer, J. 
ReillyJ. O. 
Powers, Phil. 
Deagle, Ron. 

COLUMBUS. 

Brown, T. T. 
Kemmler, R. 
Richmond, J. 

ECLIPSE. 

Whiting, E. 
Wolf, W. 
Roccius, J. 
Weaver, S. W. 

METROPOLITAN. 

Holbert, W. H. 
Ester brook, T. J. 
Brady, S. 
Caskins, C. 

ST. LOUIS. 

McGinnis, G. 
Deasley, Thos. 



Mansell, M. R. 
Peters, P. 
Laughlin, F. M. 
Dickerson, L. P. 

Birchall, A. J. 
Stovey, H. D. 
Moynahan, M. 



Clinton, J. L. 
Divon, F. R. 
Stearns, D. 



McPhee, J. A. 
McCormick, H. 
Jones, C. W. 
Corkhill, Jno. S. 



Mountain, F. II. 
Smith, J 
Kuehne, 



J.J- 

ne, W, J. 



Hecker, C. J. 
Maskrey, L. 
Latham, G, W. 



Nelson, J. 
Lynch, J. H. 
Roseman, J. 



Latham, W. A. 
Gleason, W. 



BASE BALL GUIDE. 



Cuthbert, E. E. 
Loftus, T. J. 



Gleason, J. 
Nicol, Hugh 



Dolan, T. 
Streif, Geo. A. 



NORTH-WESTERN LEAGUE. 

BAY CITY. 



McQuaid, John 
O'Day, Henry M. 
Irwin, John 
Knowdell, Jacob 



Kinzie, W. H. 
Scott, Milton P. 
Merrill, E. 
Keirns, John A. 

Gastfield, Edward 
Hillary, James J. 
Jones, Henry M. 
West, Milton D. 

Casey, Jas . 
Featherstone, B. 
Davis, James 



Roche, Wm. J. 
Knight, Jonas W. 
Morrissey, Thos. 
Thompson, J. P. F. 

FORT WAYNE. 

Clarke, Byron E. 
Reins en, "John J. 
Sodwers, Len. 

GRAND RAPIDS. 

Meinke, Frank 
Sullivan, John 
Arundel, Harry 

QUINCY. 

Black, Rob't. 



Montgomery, W. B. 
Tray, James 
Fontz, David 



Vott, Wm. F. 
Geiss, Win. 
Phillips, Ban-. 



Goetzean, Chas. H. 
Ross, Rob't F. 
Keirns, Thos. 



Jones, Chas. 



Brady, Benj. 
McGinlev, Dennis. 



Horan, John J. 
Pinckney, Geo. B. 
Lewis, Frank B. 



Sullivan, T. P. 
Jones, R. L. 
Gunning, Thomas 



Drew, Jas. 
Krieg, W. F. 

SPRINGFIELD. 

Colligan, Wm. 
Stapleton, Ed. 
Householder, C. F. 



Hogan, Edward 
McSorley, John B. 



Baldwin, Clarence 
Manning, Jas. H. 
Hengel, £. 



Parsons, J, S. 
Walker, Moses F 
Poorman, T, J. 
Barkley, S. W. 



Clarkson, John G. 
Nichols, Fred. 
McArthur, M. 



Tilley, Jno. C. 
Burk'ett, Harlan S. 
Ingraham, Chas. 
Moffet, S. R. 

SAGINAW. 

Foster, Thos. 
Hawes, Wm. H. 
Mansell, John 



Morton, Chas. 
Piggott, J. J. 
Miller, Jos. 



H. 



Robinson, Win. 
Casey, Orrin R. 
McGunnigle,W.H. 



SPALDING'S OFFICIAL 



AMERICAN ALLIANCE. 



Reynolds, T. H. 
Hoover, W.J. 
Moore T H. 
Manlove, C H. 

Grady, J. J- 
Firth. Geo. 

Dugan, W. II. 

Shetzline, J. 
Myers, H. C. 
Cline, J. 
Casey, D. P. 

Reardon, J. 
Myers, Lon. 
Miller, Geo. 

Kimber, S.J. 
Kienzle, Wm. 
Gardner, F. W. 
Householder, C W. 

Waitt, C C 
Barber, C. D. 
Shallix, G. 
Casey, W. B. 



ACTIVE. 

Larkins, II. 
Boyle, II. J. 
Ardner, J. A. 

ANTHRACITE. 

Knowles, J. 

BROOKLYN*. 

Geer, W. II. 

HARRISBURG. 

Smith, L. J. 
Wise, W. E. 
Say, J. 

SHAMROCK. 

Hirst, S. 
Bowers, C. 

MERRITT. 

Warner, F.J. 
Fennel lev, F.J. 
Eroslie, fit D. 
Corcoran, J. 

QUICKSTEP 

Snyder, E. 
Pyle, H. 
Kennedy, E. 
Cusick, A. 



Landis, S. 
D easier, J. 
Lynch, Thos. 



McLaughlin, B. 



McCloskey, W. G. 
Burns, T. 

Schappert, J. 



Oehler, G. 
WeiheJ- 



Greenwood, W. F, 
Sweeney, J. J. 
Caperoon, J- M. 
Farrington, Jas. 

Albert, A. F. 
Smiley, W. 
Dorr, C. A. 



STAR. 

Booth, A. S. . Powell, A. Rising C. 

Goodman, J. Cummings, A. Hall, Ai. 

The foregoing form of agreement and list of 1W**™? 
unanimously a|reed upon, after a full and free ^erenct, 
held at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York City, JeWry!,, 
1883, and the execution of such agreement, and the enac 
ment of such legislation as may be necessary to give it full 
force and effect, by our respective Leagues or Associations, 1* 
hereby unanitnonsly recommended by us. 

Conference Committee of N. L. of f^^cbOnmn. 

Conference Committee of A. A. ofR, ^ Chairma „. 

Conference Committee of N. W. L. of P. B. B. C. , b v 

Elias Matter. Chairman. 



AMERICAN SPORTS. 



A Gentlemen's Newspaper. 



Elevated in tone, and devoted to the conservation 
and promotion of the general range of legitimate 
popular sports and pastimes. 

Published Weekly; price, $3 per year. 



2 7 . Z. COWLES, - - - Editor, 
O. L. FOX \ - - Business Manager. 



THE BASE BALL DEPARTMENT 

Is particularly comprehensive ana interesting to 
lovers of the National Game. 



Send for Sample Copy. 

Office, 204 Dearborn St.. Chicago. 



<■ . ~, . - .,.- 



WORSTED WEB BELTS. 

Our Worsted Webbing is made expressly for our trade z% inches widet 
and our belts are all mounted in the best manner with russet leather trim - 
mings and strong buckles. 



No. i. 
No. 2. 
No. 2. 
No. 3. 
No. 4. 
No. 5. 



Solid White 

» Blue 

'tf. " Navy Blue.. . 
" Solid Red.... 
" " Green , . 
M " Brown. 



. per doz. $6 00 
" 6 00 

" 6 00 

*' 6 00 

" • 6 00 
" ' 6 00 



No. 7. White Center, Blue Edges per doz. $6 00 

No. 8. " " Red •* " 600 

No. 9. ** " Brown " " 600 

No. 10. " " Green " " 600 



No. 11. Blue Center. White Edge. 
No. 12. Red " " 



$600 
6 00 



Worsted Web Belts, any color, with large 2% inch Nickel Plated 

Buckle per doz. $10 00 

Cotton Web Belts, with large 2% inch Nickel Plated Buckle, " S on 

AMERICAN UNION WEB BELTS. 

No. 1 4. Red with White Edges per doz. $3 00 

No. 15. Blue " " " 300 

Sample Belt mailed upon receipt of price. 

BASE BALL STOCKINGS. 

PER DOZ. 

League Regulation, made of the finest worsted yarn. The following 
colors cm be obtained : White, Light Blue, Navy Blue, 

Scarlet, Gray, Green, Old Gold, Brown $18 00 

No. XX. Extra quality finest Woolen Stockings, Scarlet, Blue, 

Brown or Green 15 00 

No. 1. Fine quality Woolen Stockings, Scarlet, Blue or Ilrown... 13 00 
No. 2. Good quality Woolen Stockings, Scarlet, Blue or Brown.. 9 00 
No. 3. Second quality Woolen Stockings, Scarlet, or Blue, with 

white or drab'cotton feet 7 5° 

No. o. Finest German Cotton Base Ball Hose, made and imported 
expressly for our own trade— Solid White, Red, Blue or 

Brown 13 50 

No. 00. Same as No. o, second grade, same colors 10 00 

No. 000. " No. o, third " « S 00 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

108 Madison Street, Chicago, 111. 



BASE BALL CAPS AND HATS. 



J1IH 




No. II 



No. 19. 



No. 21. 



No. 1. League Parti -colored Can 1S £ qual * 2tl quaL * d < * ual * 
No. 3. Base Ball Hat. nnv ^i™." P $I ? °° 



3. Base Ball Hat, any color 
No. 5. Base Ball Can, Cnica^o style, any color 
xt t, Wlth or w itho»t stripes Y ' 

No - 7 - x^*! ^^ 5 * 2 * 1 ^ 

Ditto, all white only 9 °° 

Base Ball Cap; Jockey shape",' any "color * ' 



No. 7. 
No. 11. 

No. 11. 

No. 13. Base Ball Cap? Boston shape, 
No 10. R;is#» Rill ci.,,11 <-.„_ _ 'r 1 



Ditto, all white only 
Base Ball Cap, Bosto,. , 

l9 ' r^^^^p^ycbior .;; 5 



9 00 
9 00 
9 00 
9 00 



No « " nRt ege ? ase B:{11 ' ^'p/any coio 

NO. 21. Ditto, white onlv 



9 CO 
9 00 
9 00 



15 00 



7 So 
7 So 
7 5° 
7 So 
7 So 
7 So 
7 So 
7 So 
7 So 



6 00 



6 00 



with star., 
No. 19. Ditto, white onlv 
e Base Bal 
white only 

In addition to the styles above mentioned, we are prepared to Lke Z y 
style of Cap known, and will finish at prices corresponding to ££ 

BASES. 

Best Canvas, with marble Home Plate 

Best Canvas, with iron Home Plate * ' ' *" °° 

Best Canvas, without Home Plate 5 °° 

Straps and Iron Spikes, extra 4 oo 

„ t oo 

in ch:^ q a r r r madeinacco,i,umv ** *° '»** ^ »■ ■«-» 

BASE BALL BAT BAGS. 

^Zy&^&SZi&fW"**'**** — g^ hand,.. 

Same stvle for two dozen Bats " • • $4 oo 

6 oo 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

108 Madison St, Chicago, 111. 



Spalding's Catchers' Mask. 

After much experiment we have finally perfected 
a safe and comfortable Catchers* Mask or Face Pro- 
tector, and can recommend it to base ball catchers as 
the strongest, lightest, and most comfortable feeling- 
mask yet invented. It is made of the best material, 
well padded, and by an ingenious arra ngement of the 
wires, an unobstructed view is obtained. It is far 
superior to the old style of wire mask, or the heavy, 
dangerous steel bar mask. We make them in two 
sizes, as follows: 

None genuine with- Ncu , For a Medium Length Face, each.... $3 co 
out our Trade-Mark No> 3# For a Long . FucC( cach ? ^ 

on each Mask. No# 3 _ Boys » sizC) eac y l _ 2 - 

Mailed postpaid upon receipt of price. 




Spalding's Catchers' Cloves. 




Our new design, open 
back, catchers' gloves, made 
out of verv thick buckskin, 
and padded, is the best pro- 
tection for catchers' hands 
of anything yet devised. 
They do not interfere with 
throwing, and no catcher or 
player subject to sore hands, 
should be without a pair of 
these gloves. 

No. o. League Club Catch- 
ers' Gioves, made of extra 
heavy Indian-Tanned Buck 
selected with special care 
for the use required of 

them .per pair, $3 00 

Heavy Genuine Indian -Tanned Buck, open backs, well pad- 
ded, warranted per pair, $2 00 

No. 2. Second quality, open backs, padded " 15° 

No. 3. Third quality, open backs, padded " 100 

Sample pair mailed postpaid upon receipt of price. 



A. C. SPALDING A BROS., 

108 Madison Street, Chicago. 



J - • No. 2. 

No. i. League Club Shoe. Same as used by League Clubs. Made 
of Leather in the best manner. The Standard Screw 
Fastener is used. Price per pair it $600 

No. 2. Chicago Club Shoe. Extra quality canvas, foxed with French 

call. The Standard Screw Fastener is used. Price per pair 4 00 




Base !Ba,ll Slxoes . 





N «- 3- ISO. 4. 

No. 3. Amateur, or Practice Shoe. Good quality canvas, strap 

over instep. Price per pair ..." . $z 00 

No. 3X. Amateur Base Ball Shoe for Boys. Second quality canvas. 

Price per pair . . . 17- 

No. 4. Oxford Tie Base Ball Shoe. Low cut, canvas. Price per pair 2 00 



SPALDING'S STEEL SHOE PLATES. 



For Base Ball and Cricket Flayers. 
Our New Steel Shoe Plates, as represented in 
the following cut, are now in use by nearly every 
professional player in the country. "The old style 
of single spikes has been done away with, and this 
style of plate is now in general use. They are made 
oftr ' 



\^ s 

l^fl ftta°^ tne be " st steel, and so"tempered that they will not 

•JKjrbend or break. They can be used on any Shoe, 

^to^x- — "^X^Ir :lnc * P ut on anf * taken off at pleasure. They are the 

^ ^"^ cheapest, lig-htest, and most durable, as well as the 

easiest to adjust, of any plate made. The majority of professional plavers 

use these plates both on the heel and toe. Each set is put up with screws 

complete. 

Spalding's Steel Plates with Screws Per pair, 25c. Per doz. pair, $2 50 

MAILED UPON RECEIPT OF PRICE. 

SPALDING'S MALLEABLE IRON 
SHOE PLATES. 

Our Malleable Iron Plates are made after the 
most approved pattern (see cut), which renders 
" ht. 




them not only very strong but lig-i 
Per nir- 
dc 



- ... $ 15 
Per dozen pair 1 50 

MAILED UPON RECEIPT OK PRICE. 



SPALDING & BROS., 

108 Madison Street, Chicago, III. 



SPALDING' S SCO RE BOOK. 

Spalding's new design Pocket and Club Score Book continues to be the 
popular score book, and is used by all the leading scorers and base ball 
reporters. They are adapted for the spectator of ball games, who scores 
for his own amusement, as well as the official club scorer, who records the 
minutest detail. By this new system, the art of scoring can be acquired in 
a single game. 

Full instructions, with the latest League rules, accompany each book. 



WHAT AUTHORITIES SAY OF IT. 

Messrs. A. G. Spalding & Bros., Chicago, 111. 

Gentlemen'-- 1 have carefully examined the Spalding Score Book, and, 
without any hesitation, I cheerfully recommend it as the most complete 
system of scoring of which I have any knowledge. 

Respectfully, 
NT. E. YOUNG, Official Scorer Nat'l League P. B. B. Clubs. 



The new system of score books just issued by A. G. Spalding «& Hros. of 
Chicago, are the neatest thii^f of the kind we ever saw. Every lov. r of the 
game should have one. They are simple in their construction, and are easily 
unders tood.— Cincinnati Enquirer. 

The Tribune has received from A. G. Spalding & Bros., 10S Madison 
Street, a copy of their new score book for use this year. The book or system 
is so far in advance of anything ever before brought out in the way of sim- 
plicity, convenience and accuracy, that it seems wonderful that it was not 
thought of years ago. The new style will be in universal use before the 
season is half through. — Chicago Tribune, 

A. G. Spalding, Captain of the Chicago White Stockings, has jus through t 
out a new score book, which will meet with the unqualified indorsement of 
everybody who has ever undertaken to score a game of base ball. They are 
of various sizes, to meet the requirements both of the spectator who scores 
simply for his own satisfaction, and for offici A scores of clubs. The novel 
and commending feature of the book is the manner in which each of the 
squares opposite the name of the player is utilized by a division which 
originated with Mr. Spalding. Each of these squares Is divided into five 
spaces by a diamond in its center, from the points of which lines extend to 
each of the four sides of the square. Each of these spaces is designed for 
the use of the scorer according to marks and signs given in the book. By 
thus dividing the squares into spaces he scores without the liability to make 
mistakes. The League rules of scoring are printed in the book.— N.T.Clipper. 

PRICES = 
POCKET. 

EACH. 

No. i. Paper Cover, 7 games $ .10 

No. 2. Board Cover, 22 games .2$ 

No. j. Board Cover, 46 games . . .- .50 

Score Cards 05 

CEUB BOOKS. 

No. 4. Large Size, 30 games.... $1.00 

No. 5. Large " 60 games 1.75 

No. o. Large " 90 games , 2.50 

No. 7. Large " 120 games 3.C0 

Mailed upon receipt of price. 
Address A. O. S1MUMXU & BROS., Publisher*, 

10S Madison SI rod. CHICAGO, ILL. 



: 



SPALDING'S TRADE- MARKED BATS. 



These celebrated bats were first introduced in 1877, and they 
have gradually grown into -popularity, until now they are used 
almost exclusively by -all prominent professional and amateur 
players." All the timber used in these bats is allowed to season 
from one to two years in the sun before being- made up, and the 
result is we are enabled to make much lighter and stronger bats 
than where the timber is hastily "kiln-dried," as done by nearly 
all manufacturers of cheap goods. Each bat is turned by hand, 
after the most approved and varied models, and if found to an- 
swer the requirements as to weight, size, length, etc., the trade- 
mark is stamped on each bat to insure its genuineness. We point 
with much pride to the handsome testimonials given these bats by 
the leading batters of the country, as printed on the adjoining 
page 

FH.IOZSS. Retail, ^erdoz. 

each. Net. 
o — Spalding's Trade- Marked Second -Growth 
Ash Bat, made on most approved models, as 

recommended by League players 75c $7 50 

1 — -Spalding's Trade- Marked Ash Bat, made on 
different models, finished with two coats of 
the best orange shellac, and highly polished, 40c 4 00 
j B — Spalding's Trade-Marked Boys' Ash Bat, 

30 to 34 inch 35c 3 00 

2 — Spalding's Trade-Marked Cherry Bat, simi- 
lar in stvle and finish to the ash 40c 4 00 

2 B— Spalding's Trade -Marked Boys' Cherry 



H 



No. 



No. 



No. 



No. 
No. 



Bat j 30 to 34jinches ~ . . . . , 35c 

Lldii 



3 00 



3 00 
3 50 



S So 

4 00 



No. 3— Spalding's Trade-Marked Basswood Bat, 
light weight, clear, white selected timber, 
polished 35c 

No. 3 B— Spalding's Trade-Marked Boys' Basswood 

Bat, 30 to 34 inches 25c 

MM No. 4— Spalding's Trade-Marked Willow Bat, light 
weight,'large handles, highly polished, and 
each bat encased in a strong" paper bag; the 
best light wood bat made *" 50c 

No. 4 B — Spalding's Trade-Marked Boys' Willow 

Bat, 30 to 34 inches 40c 

PLAIN FINISHED BATS. 

No, 6 — Men's Ash Bats, plain finish, 56 to 40 in 25c 

No. 7— Men's Bass Bats, " " 36 to 40 in 20c 

No. S— Boy's Ash Bats, u " 3S to 34 in ^S c 

No. 9— Boy's Bass Bats, M " 2S to 34 in 15c 

FANCY BATS. 

fiH No. 10 — Cherry Bats, oiled, selected timber 25c 

HuHl ** °* 11— Ash Bats, one -half polished ."30c 

lUPP j^o. i3_Bass Bats, one-half polished 30c 

No. 13 — Ash Bats, full polished 50c 

No. 14— Bass Bats, full polis ed 50c 

No, !$_ Ash Bats, wound handles, plain 50c 

No. 16— Bass Bats, wound handles, plain 50c 

No. 17— Ash Bats, wound handles, highly polished 6bc 

Mo. r§_Bass Bats, wound handles, highly polished fyoc 

Save express charges by sending money with order, that we may send by 
freight. 

A. C. SPALDING & BROS., 

Manufacturers, CHICAGO, ILL. 



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